34th EARSeL Symposium

Last week I attended the 34th Symposium of the European Association of Remote Sensing Laboratories, known as EARSeL, in Warsaw, Poland. Originally formed in 1977, EARSeL is a scientific network of academic and commercial remote sensing organisations. It aims include:

  • promoting education and training related to remote sensing and specifically Earth Observation (EO),
  • undertaking joint research projects on the use, and application, of remote sensing,
  • providing governmental, and non-governmental organisations, with a network of remote sensing experts.
EARSeL Bureau Handover Warsaw 2014

EARSeL Bureau Handover
Warsaw 2014

EARSeL is run by a Council of elected national representatives and an executive Bureau, elected by the Council. For the last year I have been proud to serve on the EARSeL executive Bureau as Treasurer for the organisation.  My term of office finished at the symposium, and I’d like to wish the new Bureau a successful year.

In addition I was also the co-chair and presenter for the Oceans & Coastal Zones session on the Monday afternoon and on the Wednesday I taught a session on ‘Introduction to optical data processing with BEAM’ as part of the joint EARSeL & ISPRS (International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing) Young Scientist Days which ran alongside the symposium.

For me the promotion of science generally, and specifically Earth Observation (EO), is an integral part of running Pixalytics. I want to support more people to understand and get involved; in particular, it’s vital that we educate and inspire the early career, and next generation, scientists.

It’s for these reasons that I enjoy working with, and being part of, organisations that are working to inform, educate and promote similar scientific aims. As well as EARSeL treasurer, I was also the Chair of the UK Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry Society (RSPSoc) for three years, and I’m currently vice-chairman of the British Association of Remote Sensing Companies (BARSC).

It can be challenging to balance the income earning side of Pixalytics with the volunteering side, but it’s worth it. There is a real case for businesses getting their employees to volunteer to support work outside of the company, whether it’s industry promotion, teaching or helping support social issues in the local community. Aside from the obvious support for the cause they are volunteering for, it can also help develop skills in time management, decision-making and leadership.

I’ve learnt a huge amount working with the different organisations, as well as developing skills I’ve met people outside my specialism and have strengthened by business network.  I have no intention of stopping volunteering, and I’ve always got one eye out for new opportunities. Volunteering can add value to your company, however large or small, and I’d recommend all organisations should consider the opportunities this could provide for them and their employees.