UK Space Conference Getting Ready For Take Off

Next week we’ll be in Manchester at the 2017 UK Space Conference.

The UK Space Conference is held every two years, and attracted over 1,000 delegates and over 100 exhibitors when held in Liverpool in 2015. It is a key event that brings together the UK Space Community and this year is taking place over three days, 30th May to the 1st June.

We are exhibiting on stand C7, near the centre of the hall, where you’ll be able to come and talk to us about our products and services including:

  • Atmospheric correction
  • Consultancy services
  • Education & training
  • Flood mapping
  • Ocean colour
  • Spatial analyses & data management
  • Terrestrial vegetation
  • Turbidity mapping

We’re also delighted to announce that our Flood Mapping work is one of the products highlighted in the Innovation Zone, which is sponsored by Innovate UK. It is a low cost floodwater mapping product based on Sentinel-1 radar data, which provides easy to understand flood information and maps through an online portal without the need for specialist knowledge. We have partnered with Harris Geospatial Solutions to provide a fully automated solution.

We’ll also have copies of our book for sale, ‘Practical Handbook of Remote Sensing’. This takes complete novices through the process of finding, downloading, processing, visualising and applying remote sensing satellite data using their own PC, open-source software and a standard internet connection.

The 2017 UK Space Conference itself begins on the Tuesday morning with ‘Space 101’, which is a series of workshops covering some of the key issues related to working in the space sector. The conference then kicks off at lunchtime on the Tuesday with an opening plenary on the latest developments in the UK space sector.

There is a networking event in the Exhibition Hall between 6pm and 9pm on Tuesday evening, and we’ll be on our stand all evening.

Wednesday is brimming over with workshops, presentations, plenary and poster sessions, culminating in the Gala Dinner and Sir Arthur Clarke Awards. Finally, Thursday has another busy day of workshops and plenary sessions, before the Conference closes in the afternoon.

We’re really excited about being in Manchester next week, and looking forward to meeting old and new friends.

We hope that any of you who at the Conference will come up and say hello! We’d love to meet you!

Small Sea Salinity & Satellite Navigation Irrigation

Artists impression of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite. Image courtesy of ESA – P. Carril.

A couple of interesting articles came out in the last week relating to ESA’s Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. It caught our attention, as we’re currently knee deep in SMOS data at the moment, due to the soil moisture work we’re undertaking.

SMOS was launched in November 2009 and uses the interferometry technique to make worldwide observations of soil moisture over land and salinity over the ocean. Although its data has also been used to measure floating ice and calculate crop-yield forecasts.

The satellite carries the Microwave Imaging Radiometer using Aperture Synthesis (MIRAS) instrument, which is a 2D interferometric L-band radiometer with 69 antenna receivers distributed on a Y-shaped deployable antenna array. It has a temporal resolution of three days, with a spatial resolution of around 50 km.

A recent ESA article once again showed the versatility of SMOS, reporting that it was being used to measure the salinity in smaller seas, such as the Mediterranean. This was never an anticipated outcome due to radio interference and the land-sea boundary contamination – where the land and ocean data can’t be distinguished sufficiently to provide high quality measurements.

However, the interference has been reduced by shutting down illegal transmitters interrupting the SMOS signal and the land-sea contamination has been reduced by work at the Barcelona Expert Centre to change the data processing methodology.

All of this has meant that it’s possible to use SMOS to look at how water flows in and out of these smaller seas, and impact on the open oceans. This will help complement the understanding being gained from SMOS on ocean climate change, ocean acidification and the El Niño effect.

A fascinating second article described a new methodology for measuring soil moisture using reflected satellite navigation signals. The idea was originally from ESA engineer Manuel Martin-Neira, who worked on SMOS – which we accept is a bit more of a tenuous link, but we think it works for the blog! Manuel proposed using satellite navigation microwave signals to measure terrestrial features such as the topography of oceans.

This idea was further developed by former ESA employee Javier Marti, and his company Divirod, and they have created a product to try and reduce the overuse of irrigation. According to Javier, the system compares reflected and direct satnav signals to reveal the moisture content of soil and crops and could save around 30% of water and energy costs, and improve crop yields by 10-12%. It is a different methodology to SMOS, but the outcome is the same. The work is currently been tested with farmers around the Ogallala aquifer in America.

For anyone working in soil moisture, this is an interesting idea and shows what a fast moving field remote sensing is with new approaches and products being developed all the time.

Monitoring Fires From Space

Monitoring fires from space has significant advantages when compared to on-ground activity. Not only are wider areas easier to monitor, but there are obvious safety benefits too. The different ways this can be done have been highlighted through a number of reports over the last few weeks.

VIIRS Image from 25 April 2017, of the Yucatán Peninsula showing where thermal bands have picked-up increased temperatures. Data Courtesy of NASA, NASA image by Jeff Schmaltz, LANCE/EOSDIS Rapid Response.

Firstly, NASA have released images from different instruments, on different satellites, that illustrate two ways of how satellites can monitor fires.

Acquired on the 25 April 2017, an image from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi NPP satellite showed widespread fire activity across the Yucatán Peninsula in South America. The image to the right is a natural colour image and each of the red dots represents a point where the instrument’s thermal band detected temperatures higher than normal.

False colour image of the West Mims fire on Florida/Georgia boundary acquired by MODIS on 02 May 2017. Data courtesy of NASA. NASA image by Jeff Schmaltz, LANCE/EOSDIS Rapid Response.

Compare this to a wildfire on Florida-Georgia border acquired from NASA’s Aqua satellite on the 02 May 2017 using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). On the natural colour image the fires could only be seen as smoke plumes, but on the left is the false colour image which combines infrared, near-infrared and green wavelengths. The burnt areas can be clearly seen in brown, whilst the fire itself is shown as orange.

This week it was reported that the Punjab Remote Sensing Centre in India, has been combining remote sensing, geographical information systems and Global Positioning System (GPS) data to identify the burning of crop stubble in fields; it appears that the MODIS fire products are part of contributing the satellite data. During April, 788 illegal field fires were identified through this technique and with the GPS data the authorities have been able to identify, and fine, 226 farmers for undertaking this practice.

Imaged by Sentinel-2, burnt areas, shown in shades of red and purple, in the Marantaceae forests in the north of the Republic of Congo.
Data courtesy of Copernicus/ESA. Contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2016), processed by ESA.

Finally, a report at the end of April from the European Space Agency described how images from Sentinel-1 and Senintel-2 have been combined to assess the amount of forest that was burnt last year in the Republic of Congo in Africa – the majority of which was in Marantaceae forests. As this area has frequent cloud cover, the optical images from Sentinel-2 were combined with the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images from Sentinel-1 that are unaffected by the weather to offer an enhanced solution.

Sentinel-1 and Sentinel-2 data detect and monitor forest fires at a finer temporal and spatial resolution than previously possible, namely 10 days and 10 m, although the temporal resolution will increase to 5 days later this year when Sentinel-2B becomes fully operational.  Through this work, it was estimated that 36 000 hectares of forest were burnt in 2016.

Given the danger presented by forest fires and wildfires, greater monitoring from space should improve fire identification and emergency responses which should potentially help save lives. This is another example of the societal benefit of satellite remote sensing.

China’s Geo-Information Survey

Yuqiao Reservoir, east of Beijing, China from Landsat 8 acquired March 2017. Data courtesy of NASA/USGS,.

The first national geo-information study of China was released last week at a State Council Information Office press briefing.

The study, also referred to as the national census of geographic conditions, was originally announced in March 2013. Over the last three years 50,000 professionals have been involved in collecting a variety of data about China and it’s reported that they have achieved a 92% coverage of the country, generating around 770 terabytes of data in the process.

Data has been collected on natural resources, such as land features, vegetation, water and deserts; together with urban resources such as transport infrastructure, towns and neighbourhoods. This information was gathered, and verified, through remote sensing satellites, drones, aerial photography, 3D laser scanning and in-situ data. It’s reported that the accuracy is 99.7% with a 1 m resolution.

China is one of the largest countries in the world by land mass, at approximately 9.6 m square kilometres. Therefore, simply completing such a study with the accuracy and resolution reported is highly impressive.

It may take years to fully appreciate the variety, size and usefulness of this new dataset. However, a number of interesting high level statistics have already been released by the Chinese Ministry of Land and Resources including:

  • 23.2% of China’s land is above 3,500 m altitude, and 43.4% is below 1,000 m altitude.
  • 7.57 million sq km of the country has vegetation cover, with 21.1% being cultivated lands and the remainder grasslands and forests.
  • 1.3 million sq km of land is desert and bare lands, whilst rivers cover 6.55 million sq km.
  • 153,000 sq km of land has buildings on it.
  • 116,500 sq km of railway track and there is 2 million sq km of roads.

According to Kurex Mexsut, deputy head of the National Administration of Surveying, Mapping and Geoinformation, the Chinese Government will be looking to establish a data sharing mechanism and information services platform for this dataset, together with a variety of data products. It is hoped that public departments and companies will be able to use this to help improve the delivery of public services.

Although not from the survey, the image at the top is of the Yuqiao Reservoir, situated just to the east of Beijing. It has a surface area of 119 sq km, with an average depth of 14 metres.

Not only is this a comprehensive geo-information dataset for a single country, but there is also huge potential for further information to be derived from this dataset. We’ll be watching with interest to see how the data is used and the impact it has.

Beware of the Bluetooth Gnomes and Other Stories from GISRUK 2017

Gorton Monastry, GISRUK 2017

The 2017 GIS Research UK (GISRUK) Conference took place last week in Manchester, and Pixalytics sponsored the Best Early-Career Researcher Prize.

I was looking forward to the event, but I nearly didn’t get there! I was planning to catch the train up from London on Wednesday. However, the trackside fire at Euston station put paid to that, as my train was cancelled. Instead I was at the station bright and early on Thursday morning.

The first presentation I saw was the inspiring keynote by Professor Andrew Hudson-Smith. He talked about ‘getting work out there and used’ and using the Internet of Things to create a ‘census of now’ i.e., rather than having census data a number of years out-of-date, collect it all of the time. Personally, I also enjoyed hearing about his Bluetooth gnomes in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, which talk to you about cyber security. A visit to his gnomes is definitely on my list for the next spare weekend in London!

I spent the rest of the afternoon in the Infrastructure stream of presentations where there were talks on spatially modelling the impact of hazards (such as flooding) on the National Grid network, human exposure to hydrocarbon pollution in Nigeria, deciding where to site, and what type of, renewable energy and investigating taxi journeys.

In the evening, the conference dinner was at ‘The Monastery’, also known as Gorton Monastery. Despite the name, it was actually a friary built by the Franciscan monks who travelled to Manchester in 1861 to serve the local Catholic community. It was one of the first churches to be completed by the Franciscans in England after the Reformation. It became derelict in the mid 1990’s and ended up on the World Monuments Fund Watch List of 100 Most Endangered Sites in the World. Since then it has been restored and is used as a spectacular community venue.

Friday started with the morning parallel sessions, and I picked ‘Visualisation’ followed by ‘Machine Learning’. Talks included ‘the Curse of Cartograms’ (and if you don’t know what these curses are, have a look here!), land-use mapping and tracking behaviour at music festivals using mobile phone generated data – which won the best spatial analysis paper. However, my favourite talk was given by Gary Priestnall on the projection augmented relief models, which use physical models of a location’s terrain that are then overlaid with imagery/videos shown using a projector. The effect was fantastic!

Our closing keynote, ‘The Great Age of Geography 2017’, was from Nick Crane, known to UK TV viewers as the ‘map man’. He reflected on the role of geographers throughout history and then into the future. He equated the breakthrough in printing, from wood blocks to copper plates that could be engraved in more detail and updated, to today’s transition from analogue to digital.

The conference finished with the awards. I was delighted to present Alyson Lloyd and James Cheshire with the Best Early-Career Researcher Prize for their presentation on ‘Challenges of Big Data for Social Science: Addressing Uncertainty in Loyalty Card Data’. Unfortunately, as it was on Wednesday afternoon, it wasn’t one I’d seen personally. However, I’ve downloaded the conference paper, available from here, and I’m look forward to reading it.

It was an excellent conference, and I was really enjoyed my time in Manchester. Looking forward to GISRUK 2018!

Brexit Biting for UK Space Industry

Artist's rendition of a satellite - mechanik/123RF Stock Photo

Artist’s rendition of a satellite – mechanik/123RF Stock Photo

UK companies involved in European Commission space programmes face an uncertain future according to media reports over the last week. The Financial Times reported that the European Commission wanted two key clauses in the contracts for work on the next part of the €10 bn Galileo Satellite Navigation System. These would allow the Commission to:

  • Cancel the contracts, without penalty, of any supplier who is no longer based in an European Union (EU) member state; and then
  • Charge that supplier all costs associated with finding their replacements.

Clearly, this poses a huge risk to UK companies given the fact that the UK has indicated its intention to leave the EU in 2019 by triggering Article 50. We wrote about the potential impacts of Brexit last year, and whilst we did pick up concerns over Galileo we didn’t see this coming!

Should the UK Space Industry be concerned?
Yes!

Despite reports to the contrary, this does not mean we are leaving the European Space Agency (ESA). We are very much remaining part of ESA, something that was confirmed at the ministerial in December. This solely relates to programmes owned, and funded, by the European Union (EU). However, it is concerning for two key reasons:

  • Anyone who has tried to negotiate contract terms with large governmental organisations will be aware that it tends to be a binary take it or leave it scenario. Therefore, if these clauses are in the contract, then it is highly likely companies will have to sign up to them to get the work.
  • It may not just be Galileo, the Copernicus Programme could be next. Copernicus is also an EU programme, and therefore it has to be a possibility that they may apply the same clauses to future Copernicus tenders. Galileo isn’t something Pixalytics is involved with, but if this was extended to Copernicus we’d be potentially impacted and would need to make choices.

What Can UK Companies Do?
The options are limited:

  • Bid anyway! Accept the potential financial risk, or hope that it will get resolved within the various Brexit negotiations. Given the size of these contracts, it will be a brave CEO who goes down this route.
  • Not bidding for any Galileo contract is probably the financially prudent option, but equally it removes a significant revenue stream.
  • Move to another European Country. I think there will be a number of companies who will be looking at moving some, or all, of their operations to another EU member state.

Any Causes For Optimism?
Not really, but there are tiny strands of hope.

  • Security – A key issue with Galileo is security. Currently, all EU members have agreements on security and when the UK leaves the EU, it leaves that agreement. Of course, security is just one of hundreds of agreements the UK will be hoping to discuss with the EU through Brexit negations. If security agreements are reached with the UK, maybe the position will change.
  • UK Election – Whilst writing this blog, the UK Prime Minister has announced a General Election in June. Parliamentary changes may influence the type of Brexit we have, but again it is highly unlikely.

It was fairly obvious, despite the contrary political rhetoric, that Brexit would have huge consequences on the UK’s relationship with Europe.

The UK’s space industry looks as though it will be at the forefront of those consequences. Forget 2019, the bite of Brexit is being felt today!

Three Exciting Ways to Protect Forests With Remote Sensing

Forests cover one third of the Earth’s land mass and are home to more than 80% of the terrestrial species of animals, plants and insects. However, 13 million hectares of forest are destroyed each year. The United Nations International Day of Forests took place recently, on 21st March, to raise awareness of this vital resource.

Three remote sensing applications to help protect forests caught our eye recently:

Two scans show the difference between infected, on the right, and uninfected, on the left, patches of forest. Image Courtesy of University of Leiceste

Identifying Diseased Trees
In the March issue of Remote Sensing, researchers from the University of Leicester, (Barnes et al, 2017), published a paper entitled ‘Individual Tree Crown Delineation from Airborne Laser Scanning for Diseased Larch Forest Stands’. It describes how the researchers were able to identify individual trees affected by larch tree disease, also known as phytophthora ramorum.

This fungus-like disease can cause extensive damage, including the death, and diseased trees can be identified by defoliation and dieback. Airborne LiDAR surveys were undertaken by the company Bluesky at an average altitude of 1500 m, with a scan frequency of 66 Hz that gave a sensor range precision within 8 mm and elevation accuracy around 3–10 cm.

Remote sensing has been used to monitor forests for many years, but using it to identify individual trees is uncommon. The researchers in this project were able to successfully identify larch canopies partially or wholly defoliated by the disease in greater than 70% of cases. Whilst further development of the methodology will be needed, it is hoped that this will offer forest owners a better way of identifying diseased trees and enable them to respond more effectively to such outbreaks.

Monitoring Trees From Space
An interesting counterpoint to work of Barnes et al (2017) was published by the journal Forestry last month. The paper ‘Estimating stand density, biomass and tree species from very high resolution stereo-imagery – towards an all-in-one sensor for forestry applications‘ written by Fassnacht et al (2017).

It describes work undertaken to compare the results of very high resolution optical satellite data with that of airborne LiDAR and hyperspectral data to provide support for forestry management. The team used WorldView-2 images, of a temperate mixed forest in Germany, with a 2m pixel size, alongside a LiDAR DTM with a 1 m pixel size. This data was then used to estimate tree species, forest stand density and biomass.

They found  good results for both forest stand density and biomass compared to other methods, and although the tree classification work did achieve over eighty percent, this was less than achieved by hyperspectral data over the same site; although differentiation of broadleaved and coniferous trees was almost perfect.

This work shows that whilst further work is needed, optical data has the potential to offer a number of benefits for forestry management.

Monitoring Illegal Logging
Through the International Partnership Programme the UK Space Agency is funding a consortium, led by Stevenson Astrosat Ltd, who will be using Earth Observation (EO) data to monitor, and reduce, illegal logging in Guatemala.

The issue has significant environmental and socioeconomic impacts to the country through deforestation and change of land use. The Guatemalan government have made significant efforts to combat the problem, however the area to be monitored is vast. This project will provide a centralised system using EO satellite data and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) technology accessed via mobile phones or tablets to enable Guatemala’s National Institute of Forestry (INAB) to better track land management and identify cases of illegal logging.

Overall
The protection of our forests is critical to the future of the planet, and it’s clear that satellite remote sensing can play a much greater role in that work.

Pixalytics Goes To Space … Well, Nearly!

Last week the Pixalytics name got lifted towards space! In a previous blog we described how we were supporting the Plymouth University Space Society launching a weather balloon.

After a number of attempts were thwarted by the wind and weather patterns of Plymouth, last Friday was the big day. A small band of the Space Society pioneers alongside myself and Howard from Salcombe Gin, spent half an hour battling to control a weather balloon in the wind as it was pumped full of gas and had a small Pixalytics branded payload attached including a Go-Pro Camera, balloon locator, various battery packs and a small bottle of Salcombe Gin. At the top of the blog is an image of the gin high above Plymouth.

Once we were ready, the balloon was carefully walked back a few paces, and then with our hearts in our mouths, it was launched! We watched it rise gloriously until it disappeared into the low cloud that was covering the city. For anyone who wants to see the launch, it was filmed and streamed on Facebook and the recording can be found here.

Once the launch euphoria had subsided, the Space Society team jumped into a car to follow the balloon towards the predicted landing site of Taunton. The payload had a device inside which when called replied with the balloon’s location to enable progress to be tracked. The balloon actually ended up around thirty miles to the east of the prediction, coming to rest back on Earth in Yeovil. Once they got close, the team had to ask an elderly resident for permission to look through her garden for the payload package. However, it was a success and the payload was retrieved!!

On examination of the footage, sadly the Go-Pro seemed to malfunction about 15 minutes into the flight and therefore we were not able to get full flight footage. However, this is the space industry and not everything goes to plan. Once you launch most things are out of your hands!

From the flight length and distance travelled the Space Society team estimate that the balloon went up above 32,000 m. Whilst that is only about one third of the way to the Karman line, which sits around 100,000m and is commonly viewed as the boundary between the Earth’s atmosphere and the outer space, it’s probably the highest point the Pixalytics name will ever get!

Readers will be aware that we do like the unusual marketing opportunity. We’ve previously had our name going at 100 miles per hour aboard a Caterham Formula One car, so who knows what might be next?

It was great to support local students with their adventure towards space, and hopefully it will inspire them to get a job in our industry and develop their own space career!

Supporting Uganda’s Farmers

Map of Uganda showing vegetation productivity. Underlying data is the MODIS 2014 NPP Product, MOD17 – Zhoa et al. (2005).

Uganda is a landlocked country of just over 240,000 square kilometres. Agriculture is a key element of the country’s economy and was responsible for 23% of gross domestic product in 2011 and almost half the country’s exports the following year. According to the Food & Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations, 80% of the population relies on farming for its livelihood.

It has an equatorial climate, with regional variations, although recent recurrent dry spells have impacted on crop and livestock productivity. Pixalytics is delighted to be part of a consortium led by the RHEA Group, working with the Ugandan Ministry of Water and Environment and local NGOs to develop a Drought and Flood Mitigation Service (DFMS) to give practical information to help local communities respond to the effects of climate change.

Using computer models populated with satellite, meteorological, water resources and ground based data an innovative Environment Early Warning Platform will be developed to provide Ugandan farmers, via local NGO organisations, with forecasts throughout the growing seasons to enable them to take actions to maximise their crop yield.

Pixalytics, along with fellow consortium member, Environment Systems, are responsible for the Earth Observation data in the project. We’ll be looking at variety of optical and radar data to provide information about flood and drought conditions alongside crops and their growing conditions.

The project should benefit local communities by:

  • Improving the ability to forecast and mitigate droughts and floods on a local actionable scale.
  • Allowing NGOs to target resources saving time, money and lives.
  • Allowing farmers to improve their lives and better protect their livestock and crops.

Alongside ourselves, and RHEA Group, our consortium includes Environment Systems, Databasix, AA International, AgriTechTalk International, HR Wallingford, UK Met Office, Mercy Corps, and Oxford Policy Management. We will also work with international partners, including the Uganda Government Ministries, Kakira Sugar Company, and the NGO Green Dreams/iCOW. The first of a number of visits to Uganda took place last week, where we had the opportunity to make lots of local contacts and meet some of those whom we hope to benefit from this work.

This work is part of the UK Space Agency’s International Partnership Programme and ours is one of 21 projects chosen to provide solutions to local issues in counties across Africa, Asia, Central and South America.

This is a really exciting project to be involved with, and we’re looking forward to providing useful information to local farmers to allow them to take real and meaningful action to enhance the productivity, and protection, of their livestock and crops.

Catching Wavelength 2017

Remote sensing, like GIS, excels in integrating across disciplines and people. Whilst no one ever said being a multi-disciplinary scientist was going to be easy, for the ‘thirsty’ mind it challenges, cross pollinates ideas and looks at problems with new eyes. A diverse group of people connected by a common thread of spatial and remotely sensed data found themselves doing all these things and more in London last week at the Wavelength 2017 conference.

The talks and posters took us on whirlwind tour through the ever varying landscape of remote sensing. We moved through subject areas ranging from detecting ground ice, vegetation and overall land cover, through to earth surface movement and 3D imaging, and onto agriculture yield and drought. We also covered the different vertical scales from which remotely sensed data is collected, whether from satellites, planes, drones or cameras operated from ground level. On top of this focus we also had some great key note talks, running through the varied career of a remote sensing scientist (Groeger Ltd), as well as in depth data assimilation of remote sensing imagery in models (UCL) and commercial developments in airborne camera work (Geoxphere Ltd).

In parallel, we were taken on a grand tour covering the temperate UK, parts of the Middle East, the tundra in North America, the central belt of Africa, and even onto the moon and Mars! In many cases we heard talks from scientists from these countries (though not the moon or Mars …). Some are based at the universities in the UK, whilst, others came specifically to talk at the conference.

I found myself transfixed by the far flung places. Listening to how the dark side of the moon is being mapped, a place that never sees daylight and is incredibly ‘chilly’ and traps ice in these shadowed lands. I also heard about the CO2 that precipitates out of the atmosphere on Mars as snow and forms a 1m blanket. Working in places like Africa started to feel really quite local and accessible!

Possibly the most intriguing aspect of the conference for me, was the advancements that have been made in photogrammetry and how multiple photos are now being used to produce highly intricate 3D models. We saw this applied to cliff morphology and change detection, as well as the 3D point clouds that are produced when modelling trees and vegetation generally.

The 3D models aren’t totally complete due to line of sight and other issues. The model visualisations look like an impressionist painting to me, with tree leaves without trunks or clumps of green mass suspended in mid air. However, this does not matter when calculating leaf volume and biomass, as these discrepancies can be worked with and lead to some very useful estimates of seasonality and change.

Setting this up is no small feat for the organiser, and PhD student, James O’Connor. He delivered an interesting programme and looked after the delegates well. I can truly say I haven’t been to such a friendly conference before. It was also unique in providing ample time to discuss aspects of material presented, both from talks and posters, and sharing technical know-how. This felt of real value, especially to the PhD students and young professionals this conference is geared towards, but equally myself with experience in only certain fields of remote sensing.

I would highly recommend Wavelength, and look forward to seeing what they are planning for 2018!

Blog written by Caroline Chambers, Pixalytics Ltd.