British Science Won’t Be Eclipsed

Hawthorn leaves opening in Plymouth on 18th March 2015

Hawthorn leaves opening in Plymouth on 18th March 2015

We’re celebrating science in this blog, as it’s British Science Week in the UK! Despite its name British Science Week is actually a ten day programme celebrating science, technology, engineering, and maths (STEM). The week is co-ordinated by the British Science Association, a charity founded in 1831.

The British Science Association, like ourselves at Pixalytics, firmly believe that science should be at heart of society and culture and have the desire to inform, educate, and inspire people to get interested and involved in science. They promote their aims by supporting a variety of conferences, festivals, awards, training and encouraging young people to get involved in STEM subjects.

British Science week is one of their major annual festivals, and has hundreds of events running up and down the country. The website has a search facility, so you can see what events are running locally. Down here in Plymouth, the events include Ocean Science at The National Marine Aquarium, tomorrow at Museum & Art Gallery learn about the science behind the headlines and on Saturday, also at the Museum, an animal themed day including some real mini-beasts from Dartmoor Zoo – the place that inspired the 2011 film ‘We Bought A Zoo’, which starred Matt Damon and Scarlett Johnansson.

If you can’t get to any of the events in your local area, British Science Week is also promoting two citizen’s science projects:

  • Nature’s Calendar run by the Woodland Trust, asking everyone to look out for up to six common natural events to see how fast spring is arriving this year. They want to be informed of your first sightings of the orange tipped butterfly, the 7-spot ladybird, frog spawn, oak leaves, Hawthorn leaves, and Hawthorn flowers. This will continue a dataset which began in 1736, and we thought the Landsat archive was doing well.
  • Worm Watch Lab – A project to help scientists better understand how our brain works by observing the egg laying behaviour of nematode worms. You watch a 30 second video, and click a key if you see a worm lay an egg. We’ve watched a few and are yet to see the egg laying moment, but all the video watching is developing a lot of datasets for the scientists.

If you are interested in Citizen Science and go to sea, why not get involved in the citizen science work we support, by taking part in the Secchi Disk Project. Phytoplankton underpin the marine food chain and is particularly sensitive to changes in sea-surface temperatures, so this project aims to better understand their current global phytoplankton abundance. You do this by lowering a Secchi disk, a plain white disk attached to a tape measure, over the side of a boat and then recording the depth below the surface where it disappears from sight. This measurement is uploaded to the website and helps develop a global dataset of seawater clarity, which turn indicates the amount of phytoplankton at the sea surface. All the details on how to get involved are on the website.

On Friday, nature is getting involved by providing a partial solar eclipse over the UK. Starting at around 8.30am the moon will take about an hour to get to the maximum effect where the partial eclipse will be visible to the majority of the country – although the level of cloud will determine exactly what you see. Plymouth will be amongst the first places in the country to see the maximum effect around 9.23am – 9.25am, however the country’s best views will be on the Isle of Lewis in Scotland with a 98% eclipse predicted. The only two landmasses who will see a total eclipse will be the Faroe Islands and the Norwegian arctic archipelago of Svalbard. The last total eclipse in the UK was on the 24th August 1999, and the next one isn’t due until 23 September 2090!

Although the eclipse is a spectacular natural event, remember not to look directly at the sun, as this can damage your eyes. To view the eclipse wear a pair of special eclipse glasses, use a pinhole camera or watch it on the television!

We fully support British Science Week, it’s a great idea and we hope it will inspire more people to get involved in science.

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