History Comes Around

Blue Marble image of the Earth taken by the crew of Apollo 17 on Dec. 7 1972. Image Credit: NASA

Blue Marble image of the Earth taken by the crew of Apollo 17 on Dec. 7 1972.
Image Credit: NASA

Remote sensing is a relatively young industry, but it doesn’t mean we don’t have history. We do. We shouldn’t it, and were reminded why this week as we bounced back through time.

We noticed an introductory tweet yesterday from the Earth Resources Observation and Science Centre (EROS) History Project established by the US Geological Survey. This project has created an amazing online archive of information about its involvement in remote sensing that contains documents, and videos, from 1960s/70s to the current day. A few of the archive items that caught our attention were:

News Release from United States Department of the Interior on the 21st September 1966 with the title ‘Earths Resources To Be Studied From Space’. What struck us was how the phrases could be from today.

  • ‘gathering facts about the natural resources of earth’
  • ‘the time is now right and urgent to apply space technology towards the solution of many pressing natural resources problems being compound by population and industrial growth’
  • ‘An opportunity to collect valuable resource data and use it to improve the quality of our environment’

Equally, the sessions from 1973 Management & Utilization of Remote Sensing Data Symposium, organized by the American Society of Photogrammetry, could easily be describing a current conference:

  • Role of Remote Sensing in Resource Management & Planning
  • Hydrological and Environmental Applications
  • Future Sensor and Information Handling Systems
  • Agricultural and Forestry Applications

We loved the 1980 User Frustrations with Landsat, which noted data quality issues like:

  • Desert scenes have no contrast
  • There’s no underwater detail in the image
  • The image is striped!

A reminder in the news release from 15 March 1989 on how close the world came to losing the Landsat archive. This release rescinded the order, made two weeks earlier, to shutdown Landsat 4 & 5 and to provide funding until a policy review of Landsat could be completed.

The archive is a wealth of interesting details about the history of US remote sensing, including the amount of data collected over the years to the more mundane, but no less fascinating, descriptions of the furniture required to set up EROS in the first instance! We’d highly recommend you have a look at this archive – although be warned, I lost a few hours in there whilst writing this blog!!

This week is also a big anniversary for Landsat-1 which was launched on the 23rd July 1972, and the first satellite image from it was received on the 26th July 1972 beginning the 44 year archive. It’s also the Landsat Science Team’s 2016 Summer meeting this week in South Dakota, and amongst the topics of discussion are future sensor capabilities for Landsat 10 – showing not much has changed from 1973!

Although remembering the past is important, it’s vital that we also look forward to the future. At the Landsat Science Team meeting, it was noted the target launch date for Landsat 9 is the 15th December 2020, and as discussed above they are already talking about Landsat 10!

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