Have you read the top Pixalytics blogs of 2016?

Artist's rendition of a satellite - paulfleet/123RF Stock Photo

Artist’s rendition of a satellite – paulfleet/123RF Stock Photo

As this is the final blog of the year we’d like to take a look back over the past fifty-two weeks and see which blog’s captured people’s attention, and conversely which did not!

It turns out that seven of the ten most widely viewed blogs of the last year weren’t even written in 2016. Four were written in 2015, and three were written in 2014! The other obvious trend is the interest in the number of satellites in space, which can be seen by the titles of six of the ten most widely read blogs:

We’ve also found these blogs quoted by a variety of other web pages, and the occasional report. It’s always interesting to see where we’re quoted!

The other most read blogs of the year were:

Whilst only three of 2016’s blogs made our top ten, this is partly understandable as they have less time to attract the interest of readers and Google. However, looking at most read blogs of 2016 shows an interest in the growth of the Earth Observation market, Brexit, different types of data and Playboy!

We’ve now completed three years of weekly blogs, and the views on our website have grown steadily. This year has seen a significant increase in viewed pages, which is something we’re delighted to see.

We like our blog to be of interest to our colleagues in remote sensing and Earth observation, although we also touch on issues of interest to the wide space, and small business, communities.

At Pixalytics we believe strongly in education and training in both science and remote sensing, together with supporting early career scientists. As such we have a number of students and scientists working with us during the year, and we always like them to write a blog. Something they’re not always keen on at the start! This year we’ve had pieces on:

Writing a blog each week can be hard work, as Wednesday mornings always seem to come around very quickly. However, we think this work adds value to our business and makes a small contribution to explaining the industry in which we work.

Thanks for reading this year, and we hope we can catch your interest again next year.

We’d like to wish everyone a Happy New Year, and a very successful 2017!

It’s World Space Week!!

world-space-week-logoDid you know it’s World Space Week? It occurs between the 4th and 10th October each year, because:

  • On 4th October 1957 the first human-made Earth satellite, Sputnik 1, was launched; and
  • On 10th October 1967: The Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies was signed – see previous blog for more details.

This annual international celebration aims to inspire everyone about space, encourage young people to get involved in science, technology, engineering and maths and to demonstrate the benefits, and use, of space technology. The first World Space Week occurred in 2000, and each year has a specific theme.

2016 World Space Week
We’re really excited this year as the theme is ‘Remote Sensing: Enabling our Future’. It’s celebrating Earth Observation (EO), and highlighting the variety of EO missions in space and the applications which use their data.

There are over 1,000 events taking place all over the world to celebrate remote sensing, and they are all listed on the World Space Week website. It seems as though Brazil is holding the most events this year, a whopping 159! Have a look through and see if there is anything you’d like to go to. If not, create your own event –

  • Spend a night looking at the stars.
  • Use Google Earth to look at your local area from space.
  • Get some friends together and watch classic space films.
  • Build your own spacecraft – Both ESA and SSTL have cut out models you can use.

Competition!!

Competition Image courtesy of ESA.

Competition Image courtesy of ESA.

Here at Pixalytics, we couldn’t let the Remote Sensing theme go by without getting involved. So we’ve decided to run our first ever Twitter competition!! The prize is a copy of our book ‘Practical Handbook of Remote Sensing’, which guides complete beginners through the process of finding, downloading, analysing and applying remote sensing data. We’ll post the book, free of charge, anywhere in the world!

The competition has now closed. Thanks to everyone who entered.

The location was Angkor Wat in Cambodia, read more about the site our next blog.

Gathering of the UK Remote Sensing Clans

RSPSOC

The Remote Sensing & Photogrammetry Society (RSPSoc) 2016 Annual Conference is taking place this week, hosted by the University of Nottingham and the British Geological Society. Two Pixalytics staff, Dr Sam Lavender and Dr Louisa Reynolds, left Plymouth on a cold wet day on Monday, and arrived in the Nottinghamshire sunshine as befits RSPSoc week. The conference runs for three days and gives an opportunity to hear about new developments and research within remote sensing. Both Sam and Louisa are giving presentations this year.

Tuesday morning began with the opening keynote presentation given by Stephen Coulson of the European Space Agency (ESA), which discussed their comprehensive programme including the Copernicus and Earth Explorer missions. The Copernicus missions are generating ten times more data than similar previous missions, which presents logistical, processing and storage challenges for users. The future vision is to bring the user to the data, rather than the other way around. However, the benefits of cloud computing are still to be fully understood and ESA are interested in hearing about applications that couldn’t be produced with the IT technology we had 5 years ago.

After coffee Sam chaired the commercial session titled ‘The challenges (and rewards) of converting scientific research into commercial products.’ It started with three short viewpoint presentations from Jonathan Shears (Telespazio VEGA UK), Dr Sarah Johnson (University of Leicester) and Mark Jarman (Satellite Applications Catapult), and then moved into an interactive debate. It was great to see good attendance and a lively discussion ensued. Sam is planning to produce a white paper, with colleagues, based on the session. Some of the key points included:

  • Informative websites so people know what you do
  • Working with enthusiastic individuals as they will make sure something happens, and
  • To have a strong commercial business case alongside technical feasibility.
Dr Louisa Reynolds, Pixalytics Ltd, giving a presentation at RSPSoc 2016

Dr Louisa Reynolds, Pixalytics Ltd, giving a presentation at RSPSoc 2016

Louisa presented on Tuesday afternoon within the Hazards and Disaster Risk Reduction session. Her presentation was ‘A semi-automated flood mapping procedure using statistical SAR backscatter analysis’ which summarised the work Pixalytics has been doing over the last year on flood mapping which was funded by the Space for Smarter Government Programme (SSGP). Louisa was the third presenter who showed Sentinel-1 flood maps of York, and so it was a popular topic!

Alongside Louisa’s presentation, there have some fascinating other talks on topics as varied as:

  • Detecting and monitoring artisanal oil refining in the Niger Delta
  • Night time lidar reading of long-eroded gravestones
  • Photogrammatic maps of ancient water management features in Al-Jufra, Libya.
  • Seismic risk in Crete; and
  • Activities of Map Action

Although for Louisa her favourite part so far was watching a video of the launch of Sentinel 1A, through the Soyuz VS07 rocket’s discarding and deployment stages, simultaneously filmed from the craft and from the ground.

Just so you don’t think the whole event is about remote sensing, the conference also has a thriving social scene. On Monday there was a tour of The City Ground, legendary home of Nottingham Forest, by John McGovern who captained Forest to successive European Cup’s in 1979 and 1980. It was a great event and it was fascinating to hear about the irascible leadership style of Brian Clough. Tuesday’s event was a tour round the spooky Galleries of Justice Museum.

The society’s Annual General Meeting takes place on Wednesday morning; Sam’s presentation, ‘Monitoring Land Cover Dynamics: Bringing together Landsat-8 and Sentinel-2 data’, is in the Land Use/Land Cover Mapping session which follows.

The start of RSPSoc has been great as usual, offering chances to catch up with old remote sensing friends and meet some new ones. We are looking forward to rest of the conference and 2017!

Earth observation satellites in space in 2016

Blue Marble image of the Earth taken by the crew of Apollo 17 on Dec. 7 1972. Image Credit: NASA

Blue Marble image of the Earth taken by the crew of Apollo 17 on Dec. 7 1972.
Image Credit: NASA

Earth Observation (EO) satellites account for just over one quarter of all the operational satellites currently orbiting the Earth. As noted last week there are 1 419 operational satellites, and 374 of these have a main purpose of either EO or Earth Science.

What do Earth observation satellites do?
According to the information within the Union of Concerned Scientists database, the main purpose of the current operational EO satellites are:

  • Optical imaging for 165 satellites
  • Radar imaging for 34 satellites
  • Infrared imaging for 7 satellites
  • Meteorology for 37 satellites
  • Earth Science for 53 satellites
  • Electronic Intelligence for 47 satellites
  • 6 satellites with other purposes; and
  • 25 satellites simply list EO as their purpose

Who Controls Earth observation satellites?
There are 34 countries listed as being the main controllers of EO satellites, although there are also a number of joint and multinational satellites – such as those controlled by the European Space Agency (ESA). The USA is the leading country, singularly controlling one third of all EO satellites – plus they are joint controllers in others. Of course, the data from some of these satellites are widely shared across the world, such as Landsat, MODIS and SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) missions.

The USA is followed by China with about 20%, and Japan and Russia come next with around 5% each. The UK is only listed as controller on 4 satellites all related to the DMC constellation, although we are also involved in the ESA satellites.

Who uses the EO satellites?
Of the 374 operational EO satellites, the main users are:

  • Government users with 164 satellites (44%)
  • Military users with 112 satellites (30%)
  • Commercial users with 80 satellites (21%)
  • Civil users with 18 satellites (5%)

It should be noted that some of these satellites do have multiple users.

Height and Orbits of Earth observation satellites
In terms of operational EO satellite altitudes:

  • 88% are in a Low Earth Orbit, which generally refers to altitudes of between 160 and 2 000 kilometres (99 and 1 200 miles)
  • 10% are in a geostationary circular orbit at around 35 5000 kilometres (22 200 miles)
  • The remaining 2% are described as having an elliptical orbit.

In terms of the types of orbits:

  • 218 are in a sun-synchronous orbit
  • 84 in non-polar inclined orbit
  • 16 in a polar orbit
  • 17 in other orbits including elliptical, equatorial and molniya orbit; and finally
  • 39 do not have an orbit recorded.

What next?

Our first blog of 2016 noted that this was going to be an exciting year for EO, and it is proving to be the case. We’ve already seen the launches of Sentinel-1B, Sentinel-3A, Jason-3, GaoFen3 carrying a SAR instrument and further CubeSat’s as part of Planet’s Flock imaging constellation.

The rest of the year looks equally exciting with planned launches for Sentinel-2B, Japan’s Himawari 9, India’s INsat-3DR, DigitalGlobe’s Worldview 4 and NOAA’s Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-Series Program (GOES-R). We can’t wait to see all of this data in action!

Simplification in the Geospatial Industry

GEO Business 2016 at Business Design Centre, London.

GEO Business 2016 at Business Design Centre, London.

It’s May which means it’s GEO Business time at the Business Design Centre in London. Last year Pixalytics used this event to dip our collective toe into exhibiting, and this year we’ve decided to be the other side and are attending as participants. Louisa and I are here to catch up with what’s happening in the geospatial industry through the conference presentations, the workshop programme and visiting the exhibition stands.

I attended the first conference session which began with a keynote from Tom Cheesewright, Applied Futurist, which highlighted the importance of location in bringing together the physical and digital world. This led into a presentation from Ed Parsons, Geospatial Technologist from Google, which discussed the changing face of this industry. In particular, he discussed the importance of ensuring we simplify our interfaces so users don’t have to know the detail of how things work, and are only provided with relevant information they want.

Gary Gale from What3Words applies this simplification approach to positioning. In his presentation he argued that address based systems aren’t unique and coordinate systems aren’t easy for people to understand. Therefore, What3Words have proposed a naming system whereby every 3 metre square on the Earth, is referenced by just three words. For example, the Business Design Centre has a position of begins.pulse.status under this system.

A third presentation in this session was given by Prof. Gianvito Lanzolla, from Cass Business School, and discussed what business models may look like in the future. He explained that digitization leads to connectivity and reminded everyone that phones and cameras only converged in 2002. This change is now moving into data, where connected products are becoming increasingly important: with trust and speed being key attributes.

The panel debate discussed the importance of disruptors for driving innovation forward, and that markets mature over time so that only the best offerings remain. There were also thoughts on privacy as people are happy to provide locational information when they wanted a service to know where they are, but that future services need to focus on the location of the individual rather than their provided address.

This theme of simplification and ensuring that products are fit for purpose was picked up in the post-lunch session where John Taylor, from the Land Registry, described how the MapSearch product for deeds was developed. Instead of trying to develop a complex interface with all possible features, they started with a stripped down Minimum Viable Product. John highlighted the importance of discussing the solution with the users at every iteration, making sure the features included were wanted and would be used. This approach resulted in a 65% reduction in manual searches, which has reduced staff costs and saved money for customers as the manual search for deeds was charged, whilst MapSearch is available for free.

Walking around the exhibition provided a good opportunity to catch up with colleagues, and see what was trending. It was noticeable that instrumentation was accompanied by what felt like an increased percentage of stands linked to UAVs (or drones) and data analysis / web mapping companies.

As usual with conferences my head is buzzing with ideas and things to take back to Pixalytics. In a recent blog we discussed the start of our journey to develop our own products and services, and the themes of simplification and fit for purpose are certainly going to feed into our thinking!

Flooding Forecasting & Mapping

Sentinel-1 data for York overlaid in red with Pixalytics flood mapping layer based on Giustarini approach for the December 2015 flooding event. Data courtesy of ESA.

Sentinel-1 data for York overlaid in red with Pixalytics flood mapping layer based on Giustarini approach for the December 2015 flooding event. Data courtesy of ESA.

Media headlines this week have shouted that the UK is in for a sizzling summer with temperature in the nineties, coupled with potential flooding in August due to the La Niña weather process.

The headlines were based on the UK Met Office’s three month outlook for contingency planners. Unfortunately, when we looked at the information ourselves it didn’t exactly say what the media headlines claimed! The hot temperatures were just one of a number of potential scenarios for the summer. As any meteorologist will tell you, forecasting a few days ahead is difficult, forecasting a three months ahead is highly complex!

Certainly, La Niña is likely to have an influence. As we’ve previously written, this year has been influenced by a significant El Niño where there are warmer ocean temperatures in the Equatorial Pacific. La Niña is the opposite phase, with colder ocean temperatures in that region. For the UK this means there is a greater chance of summer storms, which would mean more rain and potential flooding. However, there are a lot of if’s!

At the moment our ears prick up with any mention of flooding, as Pixalytics has just completed a proof of concept project, in association with the Environment Agency, looking to improve operational flood water extent mapping information during flooding incidents.

The core of the project was to implement recent scientific research published by Matgen et al. (2011), Giustarini et al. (2013) and Greifeneder et al. (2014). So it was quite exciting to find out that Laura Guistarini was giving a presentation on flooding during the final day of last week’s ESA Living Planets Symposium in Prague – I wrote about the start of the Symposium in our previous blog.

Laura’s presentation, An Automatic SAR-Based Flood Mapping Algorithm Combining Hierarchical Tiling and Change Detection, was interesting as when we started to implement the research on Sentinel-1 data, we also came to the conclusion that the data needed to be split into tiles. It was great to hear Laura present, and I managed to pick her brains a little at the end of the session. At the top of the blog is a Sentinel-1 image of York, overlaid with a Pixalytics derived flood map in red for the December 2015 flooding based on the research published by Laura

The whole session on flooding, which took place on the last morning of the Symposium, was interesting. The presentations also included:

  • the use of CosmoSkyMed data for mapping floods in forested areas within Finland.
  • extending flood mapping to consider Sentinel-1 InSAR coherence and polarimetric information.
  • an intercomparison of the processing systems developed at DLR.
  • development of operational flood mapping in Norway.

It was useful to understand where others were making progress with Sentinel-1 data, and how different processing systems were operating. It was also interesting that several presenters showed findings, or made comments, related to the double bounce experienced when a radar signal is reflected off not just the ground, but another structure such as a building or tree. Again it is something we needed to consider as we were particularly looking at urban areas.

The case study of our flood mapping project was published last week on the Space for Smarter Government Programme website as they, via UK Space Agency, using the Small Business Research Initiative supported by Innovate UK, funded the project.

We are continuing with our research, with the aim of having our own flood mapping product later this year – although the news that August may have flooding means we might have to quicken our development pace!