Landsat Turns 45!

False colour image of Dallas, Texas. The first fully operational Landsat image taken on July 25, 1972, Image courtesy: NASA’s Earth Observatory

Landsat has celebrated forty-five years of Earth observation this week. The first Landsat mission was Earth Resources Technology Satellite 1 (ERTS-1), which was launched into a sun-synchronous near polar orbit on the 23 July 1972. It wasn’t renamed Landsat-1 until 1975. It had an anticipated life of 1 year and carried two instruments: the Multi Spectral Scanner (MSS) and the Return-Beam Vidicon (RBV).

The Landsat missions have data continuity at their heart, which has given a forty-five year archive of Earth observation imagery. However, as technological capabilities have developed the instruments on consecutive missions have improved. To demonstrate and celebrate this, NASA has produced a great video showing the changing coastal wetlands in Atchafalaya Bay, Louisiana, through the eyes of the different Landsat missions.

In total there have been eight further Landsat missions, but Landsat 6 failed to reach its designated orbit and never collected any data. The missions have been:

  • Landsat 1 launched on 23 July 1972.
  • Landsat 2 launched on 22 January 1975.
  • Landsat 3 was launched on 5 March 1978.
  • Landsat 4 launched on 16 July 1982.
  • Landsat 5 launched on 1 March 1984.
  • Landsat 7 launched on 15 April 1999, and is still active.
  • Landsat 8 launched on 11 February 2013, and is still active.

Landsat 9 is planned to be launched at the end 2020 and Landsat 10 is already being discussed.

Some of the key successes of the Landsat mission include:

  • Over 7 million scenes of the Earth’s surface.
  • Over 22 million scenes had been downloaded through the USGS-EROS website since 2008, when the data was made free-to-access, with the rate continuing to increase (Campbell 2015).
  • Economic value of just one year of Landsat data far exceeds the multi-year total cost of building, launching, and managing Landsat satellites and sensors.
  • Landsat 5 officially set a new Guinness World Records title for the ‘Longest-operating Earth observation satellite’ with its 28 years and 10 months of operation when it was decommissioned in December 2012.
  • ESA provides Landsat data downlinked via their own data receiving stations; the ESA dataset includes data collected over the open ocean, whereas USGS does not, and the data is processed using ESA’s own processor.

The journey hasn’t always been smooth. Although established by NASA, Landsat was transferred to the private sector under the management of NOAA in the early 1980’s, before returning to US Government control in 1992. There have also been technical issues, the failure of Landsat 6 described above; and Landsat 7 suffering a Scan Line Corrector failure on the 31st May 2003 which means that instead of mapping in straight lines, a zigzag ground track is followed. This causes parts of the edge of the image not to be mapped, giving a black stripe effect within these images; although the centre of the images is unaffected the data overall can still be used.

Landsat was certainly a game changer in the remote sensing and Earth observation industries, both in terms of the data continuity approach and the decision to make the data free to access. It has provided an unrivalled archive of the changing planet which has been invaluable to scientists, researchers, book-writers and businesses like Pixalytics.

We salute Landsat and wish it many more years!

AgriTech Seeds Start to Grow in Cornwall

On Monday I attended the Jump Start AgriTech event hosted by the South West Centre of Excellence in Satellite Applications at the Tremough Innovation Centre on the University of Exeter’s Penryn campus near Falmouth in Cornwall. As the name suggests the one day event covered innovations in AgriTech with a particular focus on what is, or could be, happening in the South West.

The day began with a series of short presentations and Paul Harris, Rothamsted Research, was up first on their Open Access Farm Platform. North Wyke Farm in Devon has been equipped with a variety of sensors and instruments to understand the effects of different farming practices. Of particular interest to me was their analysis of run-off, weather monitoring and soil moisture every 15 minutes; this is a great resource for satellite product validation.

I was up next talking about Earth Observation (EO) Satellite Data for AgriTech. Having seen people overpromise and oversell EO data too many times, I began with getting people to think about what they were trying to achieve, before looking at the technology. The circle of starting questions, on the right, is how I begin with potential clients. If satellite EO is the right technology from these answers, then you can start considering the combinations of both optical/microwave data and free-to-access and commercial data. I went on to show the different types of satellite imagery and what the difference in spatial resolution looks like within an agriculture setting.

I was followed by Vladimir Stolikovic, Satellite Applications Catapult, who focused on the Internet of Things and how it’s important to have sensor network data collected and communicated, with satellite broadband being used in conjunction with mobile phones and WiFi coverage.

Our last talk was by Dr Karen Anderson, University of Exeter, who looked at how drones can capture more than imagery. I was particularly intrigued by the ‘structure from motion photogrammetry’ technique which allows heights to be determined from multiple images; such that for a much lower cost, you can create something similar to what is acquired from a Lidar or laser scanning instrument. Also, by focusing on extracting height, data can be collected in conditions where there’s variable amounts of light, such as under clouds, and it doesn’t requirement high accuracy radiometric calibration.

After coffee, case studies were presented on farming applications:

  • VirtualVet – Collecting data on animal health and drug use digitally, via mobile apps, so paper records don’t become out of data and data can be collated to gain greater insights.
  • Steve Chapman, SC Nutrition Ltd, talked about improving milk production by making sure dried food is optimally prepared – large pieces of dried sweetcorn are digested less well, and a lower nutritional value is extracted from them.
  • The delightfully named, Farm Crap App from FoAM Kernow, aims to encourage farmers to spread manure rather than use artificial fertilizer. Farmers tended to go for the latter as it is easier to calculate the effects, and so having advice, regulations and the important calculations in a phone app, rather than in paper tables, should help them use manure.
  • Caterina Santachiara, ABACO, describing their siti4FARMER solution which is a cloud-computing based platform that includes data which scales from the field to farm and large land areas, with individual customisation so that users can easily see what they need to know.
  • Finally, Glyn Jones from AVANTI, talked about how farmers can stay connected to the internet, and tech support, while out in their fields. This sounds straightforward, but none of the current technologies work well enough – mainly due to the fact that fields aren’t flat! So a new technological area of investigation is ‘white space’ – these are frequencies allocated to broadcasting services, but left unused in particular geographical locations as buffers. The availability varies from location to location, but it is available to lower-powered devices.

After lunch, there were some presentations on Agritech funding opportunities from Innovate UK, AgriTech Cornwall and the South West Centre of Excellence in Satellite Applications. The day concluded with a facilitated session where small groups explored a variety of different ideas in more detail.

It was a really good day, and shows that there is real potential for AgriTech to grow in the South West.

Small Sea Salinity & Satellite Navigation Irrigation

Artists impression of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite. Image courtesy of ESA – P. Carril.

A couple of interesting articles came out in the last week relating to ESA’s Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. It caught our attention, as we’re currently knee deep in SMOS data at the moment, due to the soil moisture work we’re undertaking.

SMOS was launched in November 2009 and uses the interferometry technique to make worldwide observations of soil moisture over land and salinity over the ocean. Although its data has also been used to measure floating ice and calculate crop-yield forecasts.

The satellite carries the Microwave Imaging Radiometer using Aperture Synthesis (MIRAS) instrument, which is a 2D interferometric L-band radiometer with 69 antenna receivers distributed on a Y-shaped deployable antenna array. It has a temporal resolution of three days, with a spatial resolution of around 50 km.

A recent ESA article once again showed the versatility of SMOS, reporting that it was being used to measure the salinity in smaller seas, such as the Mediterranean. This was never an anticipated outcome due to radio interference and the land-sea boundary contamination – where the land and ocean data can’t be distinguished sufficiently to provide high quality measurements.

However, the interference has been reduced by shutting down illegal transmitters interrupting the SMOS signal and the land-sea contamination has been reduced by work at the Barcelona Expert Centre to change the data processing methodology.

All of this has meant that it’s possible to use SMOS to look at how water flows in and out of these smaller seas, and impact on the open oceans. This will help complement the understanding being gained from SMOS on ocean climate change, ocean acidification and the El Niño effect.

A fascinating second article described a new methodology for measuring soil moisture using reflected satellite navigation signals. The idea was originally from ESA engineer Manuel Martin-Neira, who worked on SMOS – which we accept is a bit more of a tenuous link, but we think it works for the blog! Manuel proposed using satellite navigation microwave signals to measure terrestrial features such as the topography of oceans.

This idea was further developed by former ESA employee Javier Marti, and his company Divirod, and they have created a product to try and reduce the overuse of irrigation. According to Javier, the system compares reflected and direct satnav signals to reveal the moisture content of soil and crops and could save around 30% of water and energy costs, and improve crop yields by 10-12%. It is a different methodology to SMOS, but the outcome is the same. The work is currently been tested with farmers around the Ogallala aquifer in America.

For anyone working in soil moisture, this is an interesting idea and shows what a fast moving field remote sensing is with new approaches and products being developed all the time.

China’s Geo-Information Survey

Yuqiao Reservoir, east of Beijing, China from Landsat 8 acquired March 2017. Data courtesy of NASA/USGS,.

The first national geo-information study of China was released last week at a State Council Information Office press briefing.

The study, also referred to as the national census of geographic conditions, was originally announced in March 2013. Over the last three years 50,000 professionals have been involved in collecting a variety of data about China and it’s reported that they have achieved a 92% coverage of the country, generating around 770 terabytes of data in the process.

Data has been collected on natural resources, such as land features, vegetation, water and deserts; together with urban resources such as transport infrastructure, towns and neighbourhoods. This information was gathered, and verified, through remote sensing satellites, drones, aerial photography, 3D laser scanning and in-situ data. It’s reported that the accuracy is 99.7% with a 1 m resolution.

China is one of the largest countries in the world by land mass, at approximately 9.6 m square kilometres. Therefore, simply completing such a study with the accuracy and resolution reported is highly impressive.

It may take years to fully appreciate the variety, size and usefulness of this new dataset. However, a number of interesting high level statistics have already been released by the Chinese Ministry of Land and Resources including:

  • 23.2% of China’s land is above 3,500 m altitude, and 43.4% is below 1,000 m altitude.
  • 7.57 million sq km of the country has vegetation cover, with 21.1% being cultivated lands and the remainder grasslands and forests.
  • 1.3 million sq km of land is desert and bare lands, whilst rivers cover 6.55 million sq km.
  • 153,000 sq km of land has buildings on it.
  • 116,500 sq km of railway track and there is 2 million sq km of roads.

According to Kurex Mexsut, deputy head of the National Administration of Surveying, Mapping and Geoinformation, the Chinese Government will be looking to establish a data sharing mechanism and information services platform for this dataset, together with a variety of data products. It is hoped that public departments and companies will be able to use this to help improve the delivery of public services.

Although not from the survey, the image at the top is of the Yuqiao Reservoir, situated just to the east of Beijing. It has a surface area of 119 sq km, with an average depth of 14 metres.

Not only is this a comprehensive geo-information dataset for a single country, but there is also huge potential for further information to be derived from this dataset. We’ll be watching with interest to see how the data is used and the impact it has.

Remote Sensing Goes Cold

Average thickness of Arctic sea ice in spring as measured by CryoSat between 2010 and 2015. Image courtesy of ESA/CPOM

Remote sensing over the Polar Regions has poked its head above the ice recently.

On the 8th February The Cryosphere, a journal of the European Geosciences Union, published a paper by Smith et al titled ’Connected sub glacial lake drainage beneath Thwaites Glacier, West Antarctica’. It described how researchers used data from ESA’s CryoSat-2 satellite to look at lakes beneath a glacier.

This work is interesting from a remote sensing viewpoint as it is a repurposing of Cryosat-2’s mission. It’s main purpose is to measure the thickness of the ice sheets and marine ice cover using its Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)/Interferometric Radar Altimeter, known as SIRAL, and it can detect millimetre changes in the elevation of both ice-sheets and sea-ice.

The team were able to use this data to determine that the ice of the glacier had subsided by several metres as water had drained away from four lakes underneath. Whilst the whole process took place between June 2012 and January 2014, the majority of the drainage happened in a six month period. During this time it’s estimated that peak drainage was around 240 cubic metre per second, which is four times faster than the outflow of the River Thames into the North Sea.

We’ve previously highlighted that repurposing data – using data for more purposes than originally intended – is going to be one of the key future innovation trends for Earth Observation.

Last week, ESA also described how Sentinel-1 and Sentinel-2 data have been used over the last five months to monitor a crack in the ice near to the Halley VI research base of the British Antarctic Survey (BAS). The crack, known as Halloween Crack, is located on the Brunt ice Shelf in the Wedell Sea sector of Antarctica and was identified last October. The crack grew around 600 m per day during November and December, although it has since slowed to only one third of that daily growth.

Since last November Sentinel-2 has been acquiring optical images at each overflight, and this has been combined with SAR data from the two Sentinel-1 satellites. This SAR data will be critical during the Antarctic winter when there are only a few hours of daylight and a couple of weeks around mid-June when the sun does not rise.

This work hit the headlines as BAS decided to evacuate their base for the winter, due to the potential threat. The Halley VI base, which was only 17km from the crack, is the first Antarctic research station to be specifically designed to allow relocation to cope with this sort of movement in the ice shelf. It was already planned to move the base 23 km further inland, and this was successfully completed on the 2nd February. Further movement will depend on how the Halloween Crack develops over the winter.

Finally, the Multidisciplinary drifting Observatory for the Study of Arctic Climate (MOSAiC) project was announced this week at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Professor Markus Rex outlined the project, which will sail a research vessel into the Arctic sea ice and let it get stuck so it can drift across the North Pole. The vessel will be filled with a variety of remote sensing in-situ instruments, and will aim to collect data on how the climate is changing in this part of the world through measuring the atmosphere-ice-ocean system.

These projects show that the Polar Regions have a lot of interest, and variety, for remote sensing.

World Record Satellite Launch

Artist's rendition of a satellite - paulfleet/123RF Stock Photo

Artist’s rendition of a satellite – paulfleet/123RF Stock Photo

Next week the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) plans to launch 104 satellites in one go aboard its Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV-C37) that will take off from Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Sriharikota, India.

To give an idea of the enormity of what ISRO is attempting, the current world record for satellites launched in a single mission is 37 by Russia in 2014. In addition, over the last fifty years the average number of objects launched in space in an entire year is only 138, according to the Online Index of Objects Launched into Outer Space maintained by the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA). Furthermore these figures reveal this single mission will exceed the number of objects launched into space for the twelve months of 1996 and for the years 2001 to 2006 inclusive.

This mission was originally planned to launch 83 satellites, then an additional 20 were added to the payload and finally a further nano-satellite was squeezed in. Of these 104 satellites, 3 will be Indian satellites and the remainder will be small satellites from countries including Germany, Israel, Kazakhstan, Netherlands, Switzerland, and the US.

One of the key challenges is to ensure that they do not collide. ISRO plans to achieve this by changing the degree of angle for each batch of satellites launched. It is expected that the entire batch of satellites will be launched within 90 minutes.

This launch is a really exciting one for the Earth Observation community because it includes:

  • Cartosat 2D is the next satellite in India’s Cartosat mission. These satellites carry both high resolution multi- spectral imagers and a panchromatic camera, and the mission focus is cartography. It has a sub-metre spatial resolution, a 10 km swath and a revisit period of four days. This is the primary payload, and will be the heaviest satellite on the launch vehicle at 730 kg.
  • Planet’s Flock 3p which consists of 88 satellites, and will be the largest constellation of satellites ever launched.

Planet was in the news last week as it confirmed it had completed the purchase of satellite imaging company Terra Bella from Google. Terra Bella’s SkySat’s fleet of high resolution satellites will complement the existing global coverage of Planet’s existing courser resolution fleet. When combined with the new satellites, this will help Planet to achieve their aim of imaging the entire globe every day. Thereby, offering a wide range of potential capabilities for Planet in the satellite data reseller/supplier market.

ISRO’s launch is currently scheduled for February 15th and will demonstrate a new level of efficiency for cubesats; something that is becoming increasingly important. We’ll be watching closely, and wish them luck.

Have you read the top Pixalytics blogs of 2016?

Artist's rendition of a satellite - paulfleet/123RF Stock Photo

Artist’s rendition of a satellite – paulfleet/123RF Stock Photo

As this is the final blog of the year we’d like to take a look back over the past fifty-two weeks and see which blog’s captured people’s attention, and conversely which did not!

It turns out that seven of the ten most widely viewed blogs of the last year weren’t even written in 2016. Four were written in 2015, and three were written in 2014! The other obvious trend is the interest in the number of satellites in space, which can be seen by the titles of six of the ten most widely read blogs:

We’ve also found these blogs quoted by a variety of other web pages, and the occasional report. It’s always interesting to see where we’re quoted!

The other most read blogs of the year were:

Whilst only three of 2016’s blogs made our top ten, this is partly understandable as they have less time to attract the interest of readers and Google. However, looking at most read blogs of 2016 shows an interest in the growth of the Earth Observation market, Brexit, different types of data and Playboy!

We’ve now completed three years of weekly blogs, and the views on our website have grown steadily. This year has seen a significant increase in viewed pages, which is something we’re delighted to see.

We like our blog to be of interest to our colleagues in remote sensing and Earth observation, although we also touch on issues of interest to the wide space, and small business, communities.

At Pixalytics we believe strongly in education and training in both science and remote sensing, together with supporting early career scientists. As such we have a number of students and scientists working with us during the year, and we always like them to write a blog. Something they’re not always keen on at the start! This year we’ve had pieces on:

Writing a blog each week can be hard work, as Wednesday mornings always seem to come around very quickly. However, we think this work adds value to our business and makes a small contribution to explaining the industry in which we work.

Thanks for reading this year, and we hope we can catch your interest again next year.

We’d like to wish everyone a Happy New Year, and a very successful 2017!

It’s World Space Week!!

world-space-week-logoDid you know it’s World Space Week? It occurs between the 4th and 10th October each year, because:

  • On 4th October 1957 the first human-made Earth satellite, Sputnik 1, was launched; and
  • On 10th October 1967: The Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies was signed – see previous blog for more details.

This annual international celebration aims to inspire everyone about space, encourage young people to get involved in science, technology, engineering and maths and to demonstrate the benefits, and use, of space technology. The first World Space Week occurred in 2000, and each year has a specific theme.

2016 World Space Week
We’re really excited this year as the theme is ‘Remote Sensing: Enabling our Future’. It’s celebrating Earth Observation (EO), and highlighting the variety of EO missions in space and the applications which use their data.

There are over 1,000 events taking place all over the world to celebrate remote sensing, and they are all listed on the World Space Week website. It seems as though Brazil is holding the most events this year, a whopping 159! Have a look through and see if there is anything you’d like to go to. If not, create your own event –

  • Spend a night looking at the stars.
  • Use Google Earth to look at your local area from space.
  • Get some friends together and watch classic space films.
  • Build your own spacecraft – Both ESA and SSTL have cut out models you can use.

Competition!!

Competition Image courtesy of ESA.

Competition Image courtesy of ESA.

Here at Pixalytics, we couldn’t let the Remote Sensing theme go by without getting involved. So we’ve decided to run our first ever Twitter competition!! The prize is a copy of our book ‘Practical Handbook of Remote Sensing’, which guides complete beginners through the process of finding, downloading, analysing and applying remote sensing data. We’ll post the book, free of charge, anywhere in the world!

The competition has now closed. Thanks to everyone who entered.

The location was Angkor Wat in Cambodia, read more about the site our next blog.

Remote Sensing and the DIKW Pyramid

DIKW PyramidSatellite remote sensing industry is evolving and anyone working in it needs to become familiar with the Data, information, Knowledge, Wisdom (DIKW) pyramid as this is one map, albeit simplistic, of the industry’s and our current journey.

Historically, satellite data was either sold as the original image or with a small amount of processing undertaken. If anyone wanted to do anything beyond basic processing, they had to do it themselves. However, things are changing.

According to a recent Euroconsult report, at least 3,600 small satellites will be launched over the next decade. The United Nations Office on Outer Space Affairs only lists 7,370 objects that have ever been launched into space, of which only 4,197 are still in orbit. We’re increasing the number of objects orbiting the Earth by 85% by smallsats alone, larger satellites will add even more.

The volume, variety and speed of this data collected by these satellites will present a step change not only in the type of applications companies will be able to offer, but, crucially, also in customer expectations – more and more they will be looking for added value.

One way of considering this is through the DIKW pyramid, which can be seen at the top of the blog, it’s credited to American organisational theorist Russell Ackoff in 1989, building on the ideas of Milan Zeleny two years earlier.

A simple summary of the pyramid starts with the collection of data which means nothing in its own right, it is simply data. Information is derived from data by asking the who, what, where, when and how questions. Knowledge is information to which expert skills and experience have been added to create more value – which is more profitable in a business context. Finally, wisdom is understanding what actions to take based on the knowledge you’ve gained.

Applying this to satellite remote sensing for agriculture, one example might be: data is the satellite data/image of the field. Information is knowing when the image was taken leading to where in the growing cycle the crop was. Knowledge is applying scientific algorithms to know the soil moisture, how much nutrients are in the soil or how much vegetation is present in various parts of the field. Wisdom is knowing what nutrients and fertilizers to apply, based on the knowledge gained, to improve crop yields.

A lot of Earth observation products are at the data or information level, with a few at the knowledge level, and even fewer at the wisdom level. Customers more and more want wisdom products, and they aren’t that interested in what was required to create them. When you add to this the additional types of geospatial information, e.g., optical and radar used together alongside airborne and in-field ground based measurements, the variety of open datasets and the new science and technological breakthroughs, things are going to look very different, very quickly.

We’d accept that the DIKW isn’t a perfect tool, nor a perfect representation of our industry, but it is simple, indicative and worth thinking about. We wrote about our intention to create products in an earlier blog. We’re a long way from the wisdom sector, but are hoping to be firmly within the knowledge sector and collaborating to create wisdom. It’s not easy and some companies will find it harder to do than others, but is going to be the future. How are you preparing?

Living Planet Is Really Buzzing!

Living planet rotating global in the exhibition area, photo: S Lavender

Living planet rotating global in the exhibition area, photo: S Lavender

This week I’m at the 2016 European Space Agency’s Living Planet Symposium taking place in sunny Prague. I didn’t arrive until lunchtime on Monday and with the event already underway I hurried to the venue. First port of call was the European Association of Remote Sensing Companies (EARSC) stand as we’ve got copies of flyers and leaflets on their stand. Why not pop along and have look!

The current excitement and interest in Earth observation (EO) was obvious when I made my way towards the final sessions of the day. The Sentinel-2 and Landsat-8 synergy presentations were packed out, all seats taken and people were crowding the door to watch!

I started with the Thematic Exploitation Platforms session. For a long time the remote sensing community has wanted more data, and now we’re receiving it in ever larger quantities e.g., the current Copernicus missions are generating terabytes of data daily. With the storage requirements this generates there is a lot of interest in the use of online platforms to hold data, and then you upload your code to it, or use tools provided by the platform, rather than everyone trying to download their own individual copies. It was interesting to compare and contrast the approaches taken with hydrology, polar, coastal, forestry and urban EO data.

Tuesday was always going to be my busiest day of the Symposium as I was chairing two sessions and giving a presentation. I had an early start as the 0800 session on Coastal Zones I was co-chairing alongside Bob Brewin –a former PhD student of mine! It was great to see people presenting their results using Sentinel-2. The spatial resolution, 10m for the highest resolution wavebands, allows us to see the detail of suspended sediment resuspension events and the 705 nm waveband can be used for phytoplankton; but we’d still like an ocean colour sensor at this spatial resolution!

In the afternoon I headed into European Climate Data Records, where there was an interesting presentation on a long time-series AVHRR above-land aerosol dataset where the AVHRR data is being vicariously calibrated using the SeaWiFS ocean colour sensor. Great to see innovation within the industry where sensors launched one set of applications can be reused in others. One thing that was emphasised by presenters in both this session, and the Coastal Zone one earlier, was the need to reprocess datasets to create improved data records.

My last session of the day was on Virtual Research, where I was both co-chairing and presenting. It returned to the theme of handling large datasets, and the presentations focused on building resources that make using EO data easier. This ranged from bringing in-situ and EO data together by standardising the formatting and metadata of the in-situ data, through community datasets for algorithm performance evaluation, to data cubes that bring all the data needed to answer specific questions together into a three- (or higher) dimensional array that means you don’t spend all your time trying to read different datasets versus ask questions of them. My own presentation focused on our involvement with the ESA funded E-Collaboration for Earth Observation (E-CEO) project, which developed a collaborative platform  where challenges can be initiated and evaluated; allowing participants to upload their code and have it evaluated against a range of metrics. We’d run an example challenge focused on the comparison of atmospheric correction processors for ocean colour data that, once setup, could easily be rerun.

I’ve already realised that there too many interesting parallel sessions here, as I missed the ocean colour presentations which I’ve heard were great. The good news for me is that these sessions were recorded. So if you haven’t be able to make to Prague in person, or like me you are here but haven’t seen everything you wanted there are going to be selection of sessions to view on ESA’s site, for example, you can see the opening session here.

Not only do events like this gives you to a fantastic chance learn about what’s happening across the EO community, but they also give you the opportunity to catch up with old friends. I am looking forward to the rest of the week!