Simplification in the Geospatial Industry

GEO Business 2016 at Business Design Centre, London.

GEO Business 2016 at Business Design Centre, London.

It’s May which means it’s GEO Business time at the Business Design Centre in London. Last year Pixalytics used this event to dip our collective toe into exhibiting, and this year we’ve decided to be the other side and are attending as participants. Louisa and I are here to catch up with what’s happening in the geospatial industry through the conference presentations, the workshop programme and visiting the exhibition stands.

I attended the first conference session which began with a keynote from Tom Cheesewright, Applied Futurist, which highlighted the importance of location in bringing together the physical and digital world. This led into a presentation from Ed Parsons, Geospatial Technologist from Google, which discussed the changing face of this industry. In particular, he discussed the importance of ensuring we simplify our interfaces so users don’t have to know the detail of how things work, and are only provided with relevant information they want.

Gary Gale from What3Words applies this simplification approach to positioning. In his presentation he argued that address based systems aren’t unique and coordinate systems aren’t easy for people to understand. Therefore, What3Words have proposed a naming system whereby every 3 metre square on the Earth, is referenced by just three words. For example, the Business Design Centre has a position of begins.pulse.status under this system.

A third presentation in this session was given by Prof. Gianvito Lanzolla, from Cass Business School, and discussed what business models may look like in the future. He explained that digitization leads to connectivity and reminded everyone that phones and cameras only converged in 2002. This change is now moving into data, where connected products are becoming increasingly important: with trust and speed being key attributes.

The panel debate discussed the importance of disruptors for driving innovation forward, and that markets mature over time so that only the best offerings remain. There were also thoughts on privacy as people are happy to provide locational information when they wanted a service to know where they are, but that future services need to focus on the location of the individual rather than their provided address.

This theme of simplification and ensuring that products are fit for purpose was picked up in the post-lunch session where John Taylor, from the Land Registry, described how the MapSearch product for deeds was developed. Instead of trying to develop a complex interface with all possible features, they started with a stripped down Minimum Viable Product. John highlighted the importance of discussing the solution with the users at every iteration, making sure the features included were wanted and would be used. This approach resulted in a 65% reduction in manual searches, which has reduced staff costs and saved money for customers as the manual search for deeds was charged, whilst MapSearch is available for free.

Walking around the exhibition provided a good opportunity to catch up with colleagues, and see what was trending. It was noticeable that instrumentation was accompanied by what felt like an increased percentage of stands linked to UAVs (or drones) and data analysis / web mapping companies.

As usual with conferences my head is buzzing with ideas and things to take back to Pixalytics. In a recent blog we discussed the start of our journey to develop our own products and services, and the themes of simplification and fit for purpose are certainly going to feed into our thinking!