Home from Hawaii

I got back to a ‘cold’ UK on Saturday afternoon after spending last week at Ocean Sciences 2014.  It was a fantastic conference with over 5,600 attendees.  My scientific highlights were:

The Surface Ocean Layer Atmosphere Study (SOLAS) session on Monday where speakers presented research on the sea surface microlayer (the top 1 mm of the ocean); this layer is important so we can understand the transfer of compounds, such as carbon dioxide, and particles from the ocean to the atmosphere and vice versa that are critical to our interpretation of the climate.

On Tuesday afternoon it was the Optics and Light in the Particle-Laden Coastal Ocean session, with presentations focused on understanding the acoustic and optical signatures of particles, including their shape, from multi-angular measurements and Lidar (laser) profiling of a phytoplankton bloom.

My key session was obviously Optical Remote Sensing of Freshwater, Estuarine and Coastal Environments on Wednesday. I gave a presentation on Multi-Sensor Ocean Colour Atmospheric Correction for Time-Series Data.  Atmospheric correction is the removal of the atmosphere’s signal from data so only the water-leaving radiance signal is left; it allows data to be compared between days irrespective of the weather conditions of that day – so an image taken on a hazy day will look like it was taken on a clear day.

HICO™ Data, image of Hong Kong from the Oregon State University HICO Sample Image Gallery, provided by the Naval Research Laboratory

HICO™ Data, image of Hong Kong from the Oregon State University HICO Sample Image Gallery, provided by the Naval Research Laboratory

Other interesting talks from this session included Tiit Kutser’s presentation on comparing in-situ measurements with MERIS data for dissolved organic carbon and iron concentrates in Lake Malaren in Sweden, Keping Du’s retrieval algorithm for phycocanian, a pigment within cyanobacteria, within Taithu lake in China, Heidi Dierssen’s optics of seagrass for remote sensing and I also really enjoyed my mentee Guangming Zheng’s presentation on suspended sediment within Chesapeake Bay, off the west coast of America – this took me back to my PhD that focussed on the suspended sediment plume from the River Humber.

Finally, there were great presentations by Curt Davis and Nick Tufillaro on the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO) mission. It’s an experimental mission that’s designed to sample the coastal ocean; one 50 x 200 km scene per orbit at a spatial resolution of around 90 m. The image on the right shows a HICO example.

On top of these oral sessions, I also spent time in the exhibition, poster sessions and some of the evening events.  My last event on the Thursday evening was about getting involved in the European Commission’s Horizon 2020 Research programme – so if anyone needs an Earth Observation specialist partner for their bid, get in touch!