Outstanding Science!

It’s British Science Week! Co-ordinated by the British Science Association (BSA) and funded by the UK Government through the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, it’s a celebration of science, engineering, technology and maths – often referred to as STEM.

The week runs from 10th to the 19th March which technically makes it a ten day festival – a slightly concerning lack of precision for a celebration of these subjects! There are events taking place all over the UK, and you can see here if there are any local to you. For us, there are nine events taking place in Plymouth. Highlights include:

  • Be a Marine Biologist for A Day running on the 16th and 17th at the Marine Biological Association
  • Science Week Challenge – Cliffhanger: On 17th of March teams of students from Secondary Schools across Plymouth will compete to design and build a machine to solve a problem.
  • Dartmoor Zoological Park running a STEM careers day. Although, sadly you’ve already missed this as it took place on Tuesday!

All of these, and the many others across the country, are fantastic for promoting, educating and inspiring everyone to get involved with STEM subjects and careers. Regularly readers know this is something that we’re very keen on at Pixalytics. Eighteen months ago we published a book, ‘Practical Handbook of Remote Sensing’, which aims to take complete beginners through the process of finding, downloading, processing and visualising remote sensing satellite data using just their home PC and an internet connection.

We were delighted to find out recently that our book has been chosen an Outstanding Academic Title (OAT) of 2016 by Choice, a publication of the Association of College & Research Libraries, a division of the American Libraries Association.

OAT’s are chosen from titles reviewed in Choice over the last year, and selected books demonstrate excellence in scholarship, presentation and a significant contribution to the field. The reviewer’s comments are integral to this process. Someone from San Diego State University reviewed our book last August and their comments included:

  • ‘a unique approach to the presentation of the subject’
  • ‘This book is successful in achieving its aim of making the science of remote sensing accessible to a broad readership.’
  • ‘Highly recommended. All library collections’

OAT’s are a celebration of the best academic books and Choice selected 500 titles out of 5,500 they reviewed last year. We’re very proud to have been included in this list.

Everyone can, and should, get involved in science. So why not go to one of the British Science Week events local to you, or if not you could always read a book!

It’s World Space Week!!

world-space-week-logoDid you know it’s World Space Week? It occurs between the 4th and 10th October each year, because:

  • On 4th October 1957 the first human-made Earth satellite, Sputnik 1, was launched; and
  • On 10th October 1967: The Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies was signed – see previous blog for more details.

This annual international celebration aims to inspire everyone about space, encourage young people to get involved in science, technology, engineering and maths and to demonstrate the benefits, and use, of space technology. The first World Space Week occurred in 2000, and each year has a specific theme.

2016 World Space Week
We’re really excited this year as the theme is ‘Remote Sensing: Enabling our Future’. It’s celebrating Earth Observation (EO), and highlighting the variety of EO missions in space and the applications which use their data.

There are over 1,000 events taking place all over the world to celebrate remote sensing, and they are all listed on the World Space Week website. It seems as though Brazil is holding the most events this year, a whopping 159! Have a look through and see if there is anything you’d like to go to. If not, create your own event –

  • Spend a night looking at the stars.
  • Use Google Earth to look at your local area from space.
  • Get some friends together and watch classic space films.
  • Build your own spacecraft – Both ESA and SSTL have cut out models you can use.

Competition!!

Competition Image courtesy of ESA.

Competition Image courtesy of ESA.

Here at Pixalytics, we couldn’t let the Remote Sensing theme go by without getting involved. So we’ve decided to run our first ever Twitter competition!! The prize is a copy of our book ‘Practical Handbook of Remote Sensing’, which guides complete beginners through the process of finding, downloading, analysing and applying remote sensing data. We’ll post the book, free of charge, anywhere in the world!

The competition has now closed. Thanks to everyone who entered.

The location was Angkor Wat in Cambodia, read more about the site our next blog.

Pixalytics Four Year Celebration!

Sutichak Yachaingham / 123 Stock Photo

Sutichak Yachaingham / 123 Stock Photo

The start of June marked the four-year anniversary of Pixalytics! We’d not realised that the time of year had come around again until Sam started receiving messages via her LinkedIn profile. A lot of small business owners are like us, busy working with their head down and they forget to look up and celebrate their successes and milestones.

So, although we had to be prompted to look up, we’re going to celebrate our milestone of Pixalytics thriving – or maybe surviving – for four years!

The last twelve months have been really successful for us, with the main highlights:

  • Doubling our company turnover.
  • Appointing our first additional full-time employee.
  • Having our book, Practical Handbook of Remote Sensing, published and being sold.
  • Winning a Space for Smarter Government Programme contract.
  • Expanding our EO products and services into AgriTech & flood mapping.
  • Being short-listed for the Plymouth Herald Small Business of the Year Award.
  • Being short-listed for the European Association of Remote Sensing Companies (EARSC) European EO Services Company Award.
  • Hosting two ERASMUS placements and other work experience students.

We wrote a blog last June identifying what we were hoping to achieve in the coming twelve months. The key things were developing our customer base, products, and services together with employing someone else full time. Those aims were definitely achieved!

Well, that’s enough of the celebrating! Like any other small business we’re much more interested in what’s in our future, than our past. We’ve still got plenty of challenges ahead:

  • Doubling our turnover was a big leap, and this year we’ve got to maintain that level and ideally grow more.
  • Despite having additional hands in the business, we still have more ideas than capacity. Some of the ideas we had last year have been taken forward by other companies, before we’ve had the chance to get around to them! We wish them success and will be watching with interest to see how they develop.
  • Marketing is hard work. None of us at Pixalytics are marketing experts, and it’s clear to us the difficulty of competing with firms who have sales and marketing teams promoting themselves at conferences and events. Our current approach is a combination of social media, and picking the events to attend. Both Sam and I are promoting Pixalytics this week, and then it’s back to the office next week to welcome our summer Space Placements in Industry (SPIN) student.

Our key target for the end of this year is to release an innovate series of automated Earth observation products and services that we can sell to clients across the world – we started to describe this journey here. We know we’ll be competing with companies much bigger than us and we know it’s not going to be easy, and to revisit the Samuel Beckett quote we used last year:

Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better.

It still holds true for how we run our company. We try things. We fail. We succeed. We learn. We try new things.

We’re looking forward to what the next twelve months, or four years, have in store.

Identifying Urban Sprawl in Plymouth

Map showing urban sprawl over last 25 years in the areas surrounding Plymouth

Map showing urban sprawl over last 25 years in the areas surrounding Plymouth

Nowadays you can answer a wide range of environmental questions yourself using only open source software and free remote sensing satellite data. You do not need to be a researcher and by acquiring a few skills you can the analysis of complex problems at your fingertips. It is amazing.

I’ve been based at Pixalytics in Plymouth, over the last few months, on an ERAMUS+ placement and decided to use Plymouth to look at one of the most problematic environmental issues for planners: Urban Sprawl. It is well known phenomenon within cities, but it can’t be easily seen from ground level – you need to look at it from space.

The pressure of continued population growth, the need for more living space, commercial and economic developments, means that central urban areas tend to expand into low-density, monofunctional and usually car-dependent communities with a high negative ecological impact on fauna and flora associated with massive loss in natural habitats and agricultural areas. This change in how land is used around cities is known urban sprawl.

As a city Plymouth suffered a lot of destruction in World War Two, and there was a lot of building within the city in the 1950s and 1960s. Therefore, I decided to see if Plymouth has suffered from urban sprawl over the last twenty-five years, using open source software and data. The two questions I want to answer are:

  1. Is Plymouth affected by urban sprawl? and
  2. If it is, what are Plymouth’s urban sprawl trends?

1) Is Plymouth affected by urban sprawl?
To answer this question I used the QGIS software to analysis Landsat data from both 1990 and 2015, together with OpenStreetMap data for natural areas for a 15 kilometre area starting from Plymouth’s City Centre.

I then performed a Landscape Evolution analysis, as described in Chapter 9 of the Practical Handbook of Remote Sensing, written by Samantha and Andrew Lavender from Pixalytics. Firstly, I overlaid natural areas onto the map of Plymouth, then added the built up areas from 2015 shown in red and finally added the 1990 built-up areas in grey.

Detailed map showing the key urban sprawl around Plymouth over last 25 years

Detailed map showing the key urban sprawl around Plymouth over last 25 years

The map, which has an accuracy of 80 – 85%, shows you, no major urban development occurred in the city of Plymouth and its surroundings in the last 25 years – this is of course about to change the development of the new town of Sherford on the outskirts of the city.

However, as you can see in the zoomed in version of the map on the right, there is a noticeable urban development visible in the north west of the city and a second in Saltash in Cornwall on the east of the map. The built up area in the 15km area around Plymouth increased by around 15% over the 25 year period. The next question is what are the trends of this sprawl.

2) What are Plymouth urban sprawl trends?
A large amount of research tries to categorize urban sprawl in various types:

  • Compact growth which infill existing urban developments, also known as smart growth, and mainly occurs in planning permitted areas
  • Linear development along main roads
  • Isolated developments into agricultural or wildlife areas in proximity with major roads.

These last two have a bad reputation and are often associated with negative impacts on environment.

Various driving forces are behind these growth types, creating different patterns for cities worldwide. For example, rapid economic development under a liberal planning policy drives population growth in a city which then is expands and incorporates villages located in near or remote proximity over time. This is fragmented approach, and results in a strong land loss.

But this is not the case for Plymouth which in the last 25 years showed a stable development in the extend permitted by planning policies with a predominant infill and compact expansion, a smart growth approach that other cities could take as an example.

These conclusions can be taken following only a few simple steps- taking advantage of free open source software and free data, without extensive experience or training.
This is a proven example of how you can make your own maps at home without investing too much time and money.

This is the end my internship with Pixalytics, and it has been one of my best experiences.

Blog written by Catalin Cimpianu, ERASMUS+ Placement at Pixalytics.

Four Step Countdown to a Book Launch

Book Launch EventRegular readers will know that we wrote our first book last year, ‘Practical Handbook of Remote Sensing’, and on Thursday, 11th February, Pixalytics is holding its first book launch event! We’ve organised it ourselves, and so we thought it might be helpful to give you our four tips for running your own event.

Four: Location, Location, Location
Where to hold the launch? We have a small office and it was not feasible to have it here, so we needed a venue. We thought about hiring rooms in hotels, bookshops or conference centres, but they didn’t feel right. It was then we thought of Plymouth Athenaeum, a local organisation interested in the promotion of the Arts, Literature, Science and Technology – as we’ve got a book on science and technology this seemed ideal!!

The Athenaeum building is in the centre of Plymouth, it was opened in 1961 after the original 1819 building was destroyed in the 1941 Plymouth Blitz. The venue has a lecture theatre, library and lounge which were perfect for what we wanted; it’s also got an actual theatre, but we decided that was a bit beyond us!

We met Owen Ryles, the Acting Honorary General Secretary, who was fantastic in sorting out the arrangements. We had a venue!

Three: Marketing & Publicity
Now we needed awareness. We needed marketing and publicity! We started tweeting about our event, and were delighted to get a lot of likes and retweets. We are really grateful to all our Twitter friends who got involved. The local newspaper, Plymouth Herald, ran an article. Our flyer was also circulated/promoted by other organisations, and we need to thank people at Hydrographic Society UK, Marine Learning Alliance, Plymouth Athenaeum, Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Plymouth Science Park and Plymouth University who were all great.

Our event has been promoted around the Plymouth area, but also as far away as Australia and USA. We’ve definitely raised awareness!

Two: Freebies
Getting bums on seats. With lots of people knowing about the event, we need to get them out of the house on what looks like being a chilly and damp February evening. So we decided to give away some freebies! The event will have:

  • Free entry
  • Free raffle to win a copy of the book will be drawn on the night.
  • Free postcards, leaflets and pens on remote sensing and Pixalytics.
  • Free refreshments – tea, coffee, biscuits and cakes.

One: Know Your Audience
Who is coming? As our event is free to attend, we don’t know who is coming or even how many! We’ve promoted it to the scientific/student community who know Sam, the local writing community who know me, the business community who know Pixalytics and those linked to the Athenaeum. It is potentially a varied cross section of an audience.

We decided to start the event with a bit about what remote sensing is, and how you can do it yourself. Sam will then use a lot of images to show the different things you can find out with remote sensing and we’ll end the first part of the evening with a discussion on what it was like to write a book together – the positive, the challenges and how close we came to divorce!

After that we’ll move to the lounge where there will be a small exhibition of remote sensing images, the book, refreshments and we’ll draw the raffle. Hopefully there will be something for everyone here.

This is the journey to our first book launch. However, there are still things we don’t know:

  • Will we remember to take everything?
  • Will the weather be horrible?
  • Are people interested in remote sensing?
  • Will anyone turn up?

We’ll tell you the answers next week!

Update After The Book Launch

To answer the questions we posed:

  • We remembered everything apart from the pineapple! (It was part of an audience participation event demonstrating the principles of remote sensing, too complicated to go into!)
  • The weather was not too bad.
  • Yes they are – given the amount of people who came up to us after the demonstration to ask questions and tell us how much they enjoyed the evening.
  • Yes! About 45 people were are the event which was great for us!

We had a great night and even managed to sell copies of the book! We found some interesting information about Plymouth Athenaeum and its links to the Royal Society, got some interest from local students and even had the local paper in attendance taking pictures!

All in all, it was very enjoyable, and tiring, evening!

 

Want to know the top ten Pixalytics blogs of the year?

Artist's rendition of a satellite - paulfleet/123RF Stock Photo

Artist’s rendition of a satellite – paulfleet/123RF Stock Photo

Have you read all of our 2015 blogs? Did you miss a few weeks for a holiday? Whatever your answers, it turns out you may not have seen our most widely read blog last year.

As this is the final blog of the year we like to take a look back over the past fifty-two weeks and see which blog’s captured people’s attention, and conversely which did not!

So what have we discovered? Well, five of the top six most read blogs of 2015 were not actually written in 2015, but in 2014! This is a really positive thing for us, as it means our writing has a currency beyond the week/month/year in which it was written. The most widely read blogs in 2015, written in 2014, were in order:

  • How many Earth observation satellites are in space?
  • What do colours mean in satellite imagery?
  • How many satellites are orbiting the Earth?
  • Why understanding spatial resolution is important?
  • Remote sensing big data: possibilities and dangers

The remainder of the top ten were written in 2015, and in order were:

  • How many satellites are orbiting the Earth in 2015?
  • Mastering Landsat images in 5 simple steps!
  • Why counting animals from spaces isn’t as hard as you think?
  • Five Landsat quirks you should know
  • How many Earth observation satellites in orbit in 2015?

The eagled eyed amongst you will have noticed an interesting overlap between the two lists, namely the obvious interest in the number of satellites, and Earth observation satellites, orbiting the planet. I have a strong feeling a 2016 update will occur sometime next year!

We know counting the number of views of the blogs doesn’t give a true picture, as blogs issued earlier in the year are likely to have been read more than later ones. Therefore I’d like to give an honourable mention to three blogs written in November and December that still made it into the top 20, despite their limited time. These were:

  • Pixalytics is growing!
  • Practical Handbook of Remote Sensing
  • Sentinel-2 data released into the wild

This is our second year of weekly blog writing, and it has got a bit easier. We try wherever possible to have the blog written by Tuesday night, so it is ready to go out the next day. This has eliminated a lot of the pressure we had last year; arriving at the office on a Wednesday morning knowing we had a blog to issue in two hours and nothing written!

One thing we do ask ourselves each year, is whether all of this effort is worth it? I know if you read all the social media experts they will tell you it is vital to write a blog, but we think about whether our blog adds value to our business?

The answers this year came from:

  • Geo-Business 2015 and the 2015 UK Space Conference – We exhibited at both of these conferences and had a significant number of people come up to our stand and tell us that they read, and enjoyed our blog, which was great to hear.
  • Catalin, our new Erasmus student – If you read last week’s blog you’ll know that Catalin found Pixalytics by seeing a blog written by our summer Erasmus student, Selin.
  • Expert Authority – We know potential clients read our blog before developing a relationship with us, and it gives them a level of confidence in terms of Pixalytics being a company who knows its field and are up to date with what is happening.

We think the blog does add value to our business, and we intend to carry on next year.

We’d like to wish everyone a Happy New Year, and a very successful 2016!

Thanks for reading.

Practical Handbook of Remote Sensing

Book ArrivalOur first book is out now!!! A dull and damp Saturday afternoon was spectacularly brightened by a deliveryman’s knock at the door, who handed over our first copies of the Practical Handbook of Remote Sensing – as you can see in the picture. It was the first time we’d got the finished paperback in our hands. Very exciting!

The book was written by us, Samantha Lavender and Andrew Lavender, and is published by CRC Press of the Taylor & Francis Group. It is a general how-to guide for anyone wanting to use remote sensing, guiding inexperienced individuals through the principles and science of remote sensing, and giving them the skills to undertake practical remote sensing at home with just a computer and free-to-access desktop software.

It’s a book Sam has wanted to write for many years: something which we hope opens up the exciting field we work in to new people. However she quickly realised that if she was writing an ‘idiots guide’, she needed an idiot – which she says is where I came in! Personally, I prefer the publisher description of me as a non-expert navigating the subject for the first time.

The first half of the book begins with the basic principles and history of remote sensing, next we have the science behind remote sensing and image processing and finally the first half is finished off with chapters on practical remote sensing and image processing with a variety of example exercises. The second half is focussed on applications of remote sensing within both land and marine environments, with details on the applications, scientific theory of the remote sensing techniques and associated practical exercises.

We aimed to make the book practical, readable and easy to understand. The principle we used was that if I couldn’t understand a section of the book, it had to be rewritten until I could understand it! We have also based it on open source software, using ESA’s Sentinel Application Platform (SNAP) and QGIS as our remote sensing and geographical information systems software. The default dataset we’ve used is Landsat; again as it is freely accessible, although a number of other datasets are also included.

We’d also like to start to build a community of ‘new’ remote sensors and so we launched a complementary website last weekend, www.playingwithrsdata.com – designed and written by the excellent i-Create Design and Square Apple. The website will keep the book users updated on any changes to software or data used in the book, provide additional exercises and a forum for people to ask questions and continue their learning.

We’re both very excited and proud about having our first book published, and we hope that people will enjoy reading it and working through the exercises to gain new skills. What’s that? You want to know where you can immediately get hold of a copy of the Practical Handbook of Remote Sensing. Well, clicking on this link will take you to our wonderful publishers who can make that happen!

Pixalytics is growing!

Practical Handbook of Remote Sensing CoverThe last week has seen two significant firsts for Pixalytics!

  • Our first book, Practical Handbook of Remote Sensing, has gone on presale!
  • Our first full time employee joined the company!

Right at the outset of establishing Pixalytics, we put down the DNA of the company we wanted to develop. Science is at the heart of Pixalytics, and we use our scientific knowledge to undertake research and development, provide products and services and to promote the scientific education and knowledge.

As part of that educational strand, we’ve written a book this year. It’s a book Sam has wanted to write for a long time, and takes people without any prior knowledge through the basic principles and science of remote sensing, gives them practical skills to undertake basic remote sensing at home and demonstrates the various applications where remote sensing can be used.

Sam quickly recognised that if she was going to write a general how-to book, she needed someone who knew nothing about the subject, which is where I came in. So together we co-wrote the book combining Sam’s 20 years of experience with my non-expert perspective of navigating through remote sensing for the first time. I have proof-read, tested and applied everything in the book; and so if I can learn remote sensing from it, anyone can!!

The book uses open source software as we wanted it to be as accessible as possible, and will be supported by a website offering news, updates, a learning forum and further exercises for people who’ve bought the book.

The book, Practical Handbook of Remote Sensing, is published by CRC Press of the Taylor & Francis Group. It went on pre-sale last week, and the actual paper copies are due to be shipped later this month. If you are interested you can order a copy here, or if you have any questions, please get in touch.

The second first for us is that we now have a full time employee, Dr Louisa Reynolds! Up until now Pixalytics has just been Sam and I, we’ve had the occasional short-term Erasmus student, PhD student, MSc placements and work experience people along the way, but not a full time employee. We’ve steadily grown the business over the last few years and we’ve reached the point where Sam no longer has enough hours in the day to do the work we have; although, Sam might say we reached that point a little while ago!

Hence, on Monday Louisa joined Pixalytics as an Earth Observation Scientist and brings with her strong skills in remote sensing, image processing, astrophysics, atmospheric and ocean physics. She will be providing support to Sam on all aspects of our Earth Observation and remote sensing work. This will significantly increase the capacity and capability of the company, which will hopefully lead to exciting new work in the future.

Overall, these are both major milestones for us and we’re delighted to welcome both Louisa and the Practical Handbook of Remote Sensing to Pixalytics.

Footprints in Remote Sensing

Plymouth Sound on 25th July 2014 from Landsat 8: Image courtesy of USGS/NASA Landsat

Plymouth Sound on 25th July 2014 from Landsat 8: Image courtesy of USGS/NASA Landsat

I’ve just finished my summer with Pixalytics! As I wrote a blog when I first arrived, I thought it would be nice symmetry to finish my ERASMUS+ placement with a second one.

When I started my internship, I had very little real-world experience. I was really excited and really nervous, but this internship has been a huge eye opener for me. I spent the first week understanding and reviewing the practicals within Pixalytics’ forthcoming book ‘The Practical Handbook of Remote Sensing’ to check for any errors prior to publication, which gave me a good understanding of the basics of remote sensing.

Over the next few weeks I applied my new knowledge to finding and downloading Landsat data for a commercial client. I then downloaded additional Landsat datasats and compared them to altimetry datasets to look for patterns between the two sources for the NovaSAR project. My other main job was processing Landsat 8 data to create a UK-wide vegetation mosaic. This needed cloud free images which is really difficult because the weather in UK is always cloudy, even in summer!

Plymouth is a deeply captivating city with astonishingly magnificent views and landscapes. You get the urban city, fantastic scenery and all around Plymouth are nice beaches, cities and the Dartmoor National Park which is always worth a visit. It’s a safe quiet place where everything is so close together that you can walk everywhere. The people are generally friendly and warm-hearted, and the experience of living in the Plymouth for two months has helped me to gain a more fluent level of English and a better understanding of the British culture – I now know why they constantly talk about the weather!

Overall, I’ve learnt a lot from the internship including practical skills that I will be able to carry with me to my next position. Needless to say, I will miss Pixalytics and Plymouth very dearly, and I’m thankful for the chance to work and live there. ERASMUS+ is an great opportunity that everyone should try to be part of, and I totally recommend going abroad because is an experience that stays with you to rest of your life.

Bye Plymouth, Bye Pixalytics!

Selin

Blog by Selin Cakaloglu, Erasmus+ Intern at Pixalytics

Four Ways Flexibility Can Be Your Company’s Core Competence

Business flexibility, Copyright: bloomua / 123RF Stock Photo

Copyright: bloomua / 123RF Stock Photo

Flexibility can be a core competence for small businesses, if they can effectively exploit it. This involves being flexible in all areas, within the principles, values and aims of your business. Zig Ziglar, an author and motivational speaker, summed this up with his quote ‘Be firm on principle, but flexible on method’. Four great ways you can exploit this core competence are:

Product/Service Flexibility
Larger businesses often create and sell a specific set of standard products to their customers. As a small business, you can adapt, modify and tailor your products and services specifically to the individual customers needs. This bespoke approach may take a little more resources, but showing this attention to detail is repaid through happy customers and further work. We believe in providing bespoke solutions to our customers, and find the process of trying to ensure that they get the remote sensing product/service that best suits their needs an exciting and rewarding challenge.

Supplier Flexibility
Don’t assume you have to do everything in the business, outsource wherever possible. This allows you to focus on the things that only you can do to grow the business; i.e., you don’t need to be your company’s accountant, web designer, marketing expert, etc. Richard Branson said ‘Everything in your business can be outsourced … if you’re not emotionally attached to doing it’, and the final part of that quote is critical. Outsource the work, not the control; it’s your business and you need to ensure your outsourcing delivers what you want. This can be difficult where you have clear opinions of what you want to achieve; and you need to work with organisations who share your ethos and vision.

Similarly, don’t tie yourself into long term contracts; unless you’re sure it is right for your business. Being based on the Plymouth Science Park, one of things we like is that moving offices is relatively easy. We moved last week from the second floor to a larger ground floor office. We’re looking to recruit a web developer internship, and so we need more space. We’ve not needed so much space for the last eighteen months, so why pay for it?

Employee Flexibility
Traditional employment methods are recruitment through adverts and everyone working together in one office; technology has changed what’s possible for companies, but the traditional approach is also still hugely prevalent. Sam’s worldwide reputation in remote sensing means we’re often contacted by people who want to work with us, and so our recruitment often occurs via people approaching us. This results in placements and internships that are as valuable as conventional employees.

Equally, we don’t necessarily require everyone to be sat in an office all week. We’re happy for people to work from home, or other locations, if that is more suitable to what they’re doing. In our experience, wherever possible, it’s best for us all to be in the office at least once a week to ensure we’re thinking on the same wavelength. Otherwise, we tend to communicate by email and Skype.

Flexibility of Approach
Whilst being trusted Earth observation experts is Pixalytics overarching company objective, we’re also committed to promoting education and training. As part of this we’ve written a book, The Practical Handbook of Remote Sensing, which is due to be published towards the end of this year. This has taken a significant amount of effort, although getting a first draft out in 9 months is also quick for this genre. Will it bring us any work? We’ve got no idea. However, we do know it will promote, educate and inform people about remote sensing that will in turn support the overall values and aims of our company.

These are four ways we use flexibility to develop our core competence. How are you exploiting flexibility in your business?