The Road To Success….

Danube river crossing The Great Romanian Flood Plain. Image acquired by Sentinel-2A on the 3rd December 2015. Data courtesy of ESA.

Danube river crossing The Great Romanian Flood Plain. Image acquired by Sentinel-2A on the 3rd December 2015. Data courtesy of ESA.

‘On the road, you will face many stumbling blocks, twists, and turns… You may never know how far the road will take you.’ **

In my case, the road brought me to Plymouth, a city on the south coast of Devon, England, a magical place with great history and outstanding views.

What I am doing here? Well, I am pursuing my dream of becoming a GIS and Remote Sensing Specialist by doing an internship through the Erasmus + programme at a local company called Pixalytics. My mentor is Dr. Samantha Lavender, is a great professional with vast experience in this field, She is also the Chairman of the British Association of Remote Sensing Companies and former Chairman of the Remote Sensing & Photogrammetry Society. For me, this is about more than just getting a grade, earning credit, or making money; this is an opportunity to learn, ask questions, and impress with my eagerness.

Finding this internship was easy for me. With a short search on Google I found this Pixalytics blog, where a previous student here had posted her impressions and thoughts on the company. I immediately said “This worth trying!” In the next moment I opened my email started writing, I sent wrote emails to multiple addresses, to make sure my message reached the target. After just two days, I received an answer from Mr. Andrew Lavender and it was positive!

I was very happy and because I knew the departure papers would take over a month to be completed, I immediately started doing them. All of this happened at the end of September. After my papers were done, I bought my flight ticket to Luton Airport, then a bus to London and then onto Plymouth. I arrived on December 5th and so, like the previous student, here I am posting my own impressions and thoughts on the Pixalytics blog page.

My first day at Pixalytics started pretty badly, I got lost and arrived a little late. I now remind myself each morning to turn left, not right, when I get off the bus. I got a short introduction to the building where the company is located, and my office for the next three months, which by the way looks very good. The office has a professional, but relaxed, atmosphere and I soon started working, one of my first tasks being the downloading of Sentinel-2A data, which proved a very difficult one due to slow data speeds and functionality of the ESA Data Hub.

Over the next three months, I am expecting to assist Pixalytics in developing their agritech products, explore the potential of Sentinel-2A data and I will be doing my own research into Urban Sprawl in Romania. I am hoping to have the opportunity to present my research at a conference during my placement.

It has been over a week now since I came to Plymouth and I feel great, working at Pixalytics is a great opportunity for my career and I will take full advantage of this. I strongly recommend all students who want to burst their work experience and who want to see what it is like to be in a professional business environment, to search for Erasmus+ placement offers as I did. You will not regret it!

Blog written by Catalin Cimpianu

** Quote is by Tony Hassini, from ‘The Road To Success’

Ocean Colour Cubes

August 2009 Monthly Chlorophyll-a Composite; data courtesy of the ESA Ocean Colour Climate Change Initiative project

August 2009 Monthly Chlorophyll-a Composite; data courtesy of the ESA Ocean Colour Climate Change Initiative project

It’s an exciting time to be in ocean colour! A couple of weeks ago we highlighted the new US partnership using ocean colour as an early warning system for harmful freshwater algae blooms, and last week a new ocean colour CubeSat development was announced.

Ocean colour is something very close to our heart; it was the basis of Sam’s PhD and a field of research she is highly active in today. When Sam began studying her PhD, Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) was the main source of satellite ocean colour data, until it was superseded by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) that became the focus of her role at Plymouth Marine Laboratory.

Currently, there are a number ocean colour instruments in orbit:

  • NASA’s twin MODIS instruments on the Terra and Aqua satellites
  • NOAA’s Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS)
  • China’s Medium Resolution Spectral Imager (MERSI), Chinese Ocean Colour and Temperature Scanner (COCTS) and Coastal Zone Imager (CZI) onboard several satellites
  • South Korea’s Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI)
  • India’s Ocean Colour Monitor on-board Oceansat-2

Despite having these instruments in orbit, there is very limited global ocean colour data available for research applications. This is because the Chinese data is not easily accessible outside China, Oceansat-2 data isn’t of sufficient quality for climate research and GOCI is a geostationary satellite so the data is only for a limited geographical area focussed on South Korea. With MODIS, the Terra satellite has limited ocean colour applications due to issues with its mirror and hence calibration; and recently the calibration on Aqua has also become unstable due to its age. Therefore, the ocean colour community is just left with VIIRS; and the data from this instrument has only been recently proved.

With limited good quality ocean colour data, there is significant concern over the potential loss of continuity in this valuable dataset. The next planned instrument to provide a global dataset will be OLCI onboard ESA’s Sentinel 3A, due to be launched in November 2015; with everyone having their fingers crossed that MODIS will hang on until then.

Launching a satellite takes time and money, and satellites carrying ocean colour sensors have generally been big, for example, Sentinel 3A weighs 1250 kg and MODIS 228.7 kg. This is why the project was announced last week to build two Ocean Colour CubeSats is so exciting; they are planned to weigh only 4 kg which reduces both the expense and the launch lead time.

The project, called SOCON (Sustained Ocean Observation from Nanosatellites), will see Clyde Space, from Glasgow in the UK, will build an initial two prototype SeaHawk CubeSats with HawkEye Ocean Colour Sensors, with a ground resolution of between 75 m and 150 m per pixel to be launched in early 2017. The project consortium includes the University of North Carolina, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Centre, Hawk Institute for Space Sciences and Cloudland Instruments. The eventual aim is to have constellations of CubeSats providing a global view of both ocean and inland waters.

There are a number of other planned ocean colour satellite launches in the next ten years including following on missions such as Oceansat-3, two missions from China, GOCI 2, and a second VIIRS mission.

With new missions, new data applications and miniaturised technology, we could be entering a purple patch for ocean colour data – although purple in ocean colour usually represents a Chlorophyll-a concentration of around 0.01 mg/m3 on the standard SeaWiFS colour palette as shown on the image at the top of the page.

We’re truly excited and looking forward to research, products and services this golden age may offer.

Celebrating World Space Week!

Did you know this is World Space Week? In 1999, the United Nations declared that World Space Week would occur between the 4th and 10th October each year. It chose these two dates because:

  • On 4th October 1957 the first human-made Earth satellite, Sputnik 1, was launched; and
  • On 10th October 1967 The Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies was signed – which was discussed in last week’s blog.

This annual international celebration supports events in countries around the world to educate people about space, encourage everyone to benefit from the space industry and inspire young people to get involved in science, technology, engineering and maths.

Space: Guiding Your Way is the theme for 2014 and focuses on all aspects of satellite navigation, from the GPS in your smartphone, though road navigation, shipping and disaster recovery. According to the World Space Week website there are over 700 events in over 60 countries taking place during this week’s celebration: everywhere from Afghanistan to Venezuela has an event, supported by a number of global events. The events vary from educational presentations, conferences and demonstrations through to water rocket competitions, training like an astronaut or even having coffee with an astronomer. The UK Space Agency has a ‘Tweet the Expert 2014’ event running between 2pm and 3pm each day this week.

Rumple Quarry in Plymbridge Woods

Rumple Quarry in Plymbridge Woods

Here at Pixalytics, we didn’t want World Space Week to go by without getting involved, and so we’ve taken part in the EarthCache Virtual 5K. Although, don’t let the word virtual fool you as there has been running! EarthCache aims to teach people about the world by highlighting interesting geologic or geographic phenomenon or features you can visit, and there are almost eighteen thousand such sites worldwide. To participate in the Virtual 5K run, you have to run at least 5K starting or ending at a registered EarthCache site.

Sam Lavender at the start of her 5K run

Sam Lavender at the start of her 5K run

Our closest EarthCache site is a quarry site in Plymbridge Woods, pictured above. Records indicate it has been worked as far back as 1683, and slate from here was reportedly used in the building of Devonport Dockyard. In addition to the quarry site, there is also a viaduct and ruins of a waterwheel and quarry workers cottages. To the right is the picture of Sam at the start of her 5K run.

Are you going to join in World Space Week? Have a look at the website and see if you can find an activity, or join us in the virtual run. Whatever you decide to do, remember you’re celebrating space and your part in this industry.