Gathering of the UK Remote Sensing Clans

RSPSOC

The Remote Sensing & Photogrammetry Society (RSPSoc) 2016 Annual Conference is taking place this week, hosted by the University of Nottingham and the British Geological Society. Two Pixalytics staff, Dr Sam Lavender and Dr Louisa Reynolds, left Plymouth on a cold wet day on Monday, and arrived in the Nottinghamshire sunshine as befits RSPSoc week. The conference runs for three days and gives an opportunity to hear about new developments and research within remote sensing. Both Sam and Louisa are giving presentations this year.

Tuesday morning began with the opening keynote presentation given by Stephen Coulson of the European Space Agency (ESA), which discussed their comprehensive programme including the Copernicus and Earth Explorer missions. The Copernicus missions are generating ten times more data than similar previous missions, which presents logistical, processing and storage challenges for users. The future vision is to bring the user to the data, rather than the other way around. However, the benefits of cloud computing are still to be fully understood and ESA are interested in hearing about applications that couldn’t be produced with the IT technology we had 5 years ago.

After coffee Sam chaired the commercial session titled ‘The challenges (and rewards) of converting scientific research into commercial products.’ It started with three short viewpoint presentations from Jonathan Shears (Telespazio VEGA UK), Dr Sarah Johnson (University of Leicester) and Mark Jarman (Satellite Applications Catapult), and then moved into an interactive debate. It was great to see good attendance and a lively discussion ensued. Sam is planning to produce a white paper, with colleagues, based on the session. Some of the key points included:

  • Informative websites so people know what you do
  • Working with enthusiastic individuals as they will make sure something happens, and
  • To have a strong commercial business case alongside technical feasibility.
Dr Louisa Reynolds, Pixalytics Ltd, giving a presentation at RSPSoc 2016

Dr Louisa Reynolds, Pixalytics Ltd, giving a presentation at RSPSoc 2016

Louisa presented on Tuesday afternoon within the Hazards and Disaster Risk Reduction session. Her presentation was ‘A semi-automated flood mapping procedure using statistical SAR backscatter analysis’ which summarised the work Pixalytics has been doing over the last year on flood mapping which was funded by the Space for Smarter Government Programme (SSGP). Louisa was the third presenter who showed Sentinel-1 flood maps of York, and so it was a popular topic!

Alongside Louisa’s presentation, there have some fascinating other talks on topics as varied as:

  • Detecting and monitoring artisanal oil refining in the Niger Delta
  • Night time lidar reading of long-eroded gravestones
  • Photogrammatic maps of ancient water management features in Al-Jufra, Libya.
  • Seismic risk in Crete; and
  • Activities of Map Action

Although for Louisa her favourite part so far was watching a video of the launch of Sentinel 1A, through the Soyuz VS07 rocket’s discarding and deployment stages, simultaneously filmed from the craft and from the ground.

Just so you don’t think the whole event is about remote sensing, the conference also has a thriving social scene. On Monday there was a tour of The City Ground, legendary home of Nottingham Forest, by John McGovern who captained Forest to successive European Cup’s in 1979 and 1980. It was a great event and it was fascinating to hear about the irascible leadership style of Brian Clough. Tuesday’s event was a tour round the spooky Galleries of Justice Museum.

The society’s Annual General Meeting takes place on Wednesday morning; Sam’s presentation, ‘Monitoring Land Cover Dynamics: Bringing together Landsat-8 and Sentinel-2 data’, is in the Land Use/Land Cover Mapping session which follows.

The start of RSPSoc has been great as usual, offering chances to catch up with old remote sensing friends and meet some new ones. We are looking forward to rest of the conference and 2017!

Flooding Forecasting & Mapping

Sentinel-1 data for York overlaid in red with Pixalytics flood mapping layer based on Giustarini approach for the December 2015 flooding event. Data courtesy of ESA.

Sentinel-1 data for York overlaid in red with Pixalytics flood mapping layer based on Giustarini approach for the December 2015 flooding event. Data courtesy of ESA.

Media headlines this week have shouted that the UK is in for a sizzling summer with temperature in the nineties, coupled with potential flooding in August due to the La Niña weather process.

The headlines were based on the UK Met Office’s three month outlook for contingency planners. Unfortunately, when we looked at the information ourselves it didn’t exactly say what the media headlines claimed! The hot temperatures were just one of a number of potential scenarios for the summer. As any meteorologist will tell you, forecasting a few days ahead is difficult, forecasting a three months ahead is highly complex!

Certainly, La Niña is likely to have an influence. As we’ve previously written, this year has been influenced by a significant El Niño where there are warmer ocean temperatures in the Equatorial Pacific. La Niña is the opposite phase, with colder ocean temperatures in that region. For the UK this means there is a greater chance of summer storms, which would mean more rain and potential flooding. However, there are a lot of if’s!

At the moment our ears prick up with any mention of flooding, as Pixalytics has just completed a proof of concept project, in association with the Environment Agency, looking to improve operational flood water extent mapping information during flooding incidents.

The core of the project was to implement recent scientific research published by Matgen et al. (2011), Giustarini et al. (2013) and Greifeneder et al. (2014). So it was quite exciting to find out that Laura Guistarini was giving a presentation on flooding during the final day of last week’s ESA Living Planets Symposium in Prague – I wrote about the start of the Symposium in our previous blog.

Laura’s presentation, An Automatic SAR-Based Flood Mapping Algorithm Combining Hierarchical Tiling and Change Detection, was interesting as when we started to implement the research on Sentinel-1 data, we also came to the conclusion that the data needed to be split into tiles. It was great to hear Laura present, and I managed to pick her brains a little at the end of the session. At the top of the blog is a Sentinel-1 image of York, overlaid with a Pixalytics derived flood map in red for the December 2015 flooding based on the research published by Laura

The whole session on flooding, which took place on the last morning of the Symposium, was interesting. The presentations also included:

  • the use of CosmoSkyMed data for mapping floods in forested areas within Finland.
  • extending flood mapping to consider Sentinel-1 InSAR coherence and polarimetric information.
  • an intercomparison of the processing systems developed at DLR.
  • development of operational flood mapping in Norway.

It was useful to understand where others were making progress with Sentinel-1 data, and how different processing systems were operating. It was also interesting that several presenters showed findings, or made comments, related to the double bounce experienced when a radar signal is reflected off not just the ground, but another structure such as a building or tree. Again it is something we needed to consider as we were particularly looking at urban areas.

The case study of our flood mapping project was published last week on the Space for Smarter Government Programme website as they, via UK Space Agency, using the Small Business Research Initiative supported by Innovate UK, funded the project.

We are continuing with our research, with the aim of having our own flood mapping product later this year – although the news that August may have flooding means we might have to quicken our development pace!