World Oceans Day

Phytoplankton Bloom off South West England. Acquired by MODIS on 12th June 2003. Data courtesy of NASA.

June 8th is World Oceans Day. This is an annual global celebration of the oceans, their importance and how they can be protected for the future.

The idea of a World Ocean Day was originally proposed by the Canadian Government at the Earth Summit in Rio in 1992. In December 2008 a resolution was passed by United Nations General Assembly which officially declared that June 8th would be World Oceans Day. The annual celebration is co-ordinated by the Ocean Project organisation, and is growing from strength to strength with over 100 countries having participated last year.

There is a different theme each year and for 2017 it’s “Our Oceans, Our Future”, with a focus on preventing plastic pollution of the ocean and cleaning marine litter.

Why The Oceans Are Important?

  • The oceans cover over 71% of the planet and account for 96% of the water on Earth.
  • Half of all the oxygen in the atmosphere is released by phytoplankton through photosynthesis. Phytoplankton blooms are of huge interest to us at Pixalytics as despite their miniscule size, in large enough quantities, phytoplankton can be seen from space.
  • They help regulate climate by absorbing around 25% of the CO2 human activities release into the atmosphere.
  • Between 50% and 80% of all life on the planet is found in the oceans.
  • Less than 10% of the oceans have been explored by humans. More people have stood on the moon than the deepest point of the oceans – the Mariana Trench in the Pacific Ocean at around 11 km deep.
  • Fish accounted for about 17% of the global population’s intake of animal protein in 2013.

Why This Year’s Theme Is Important?

The pollution of the oceans by plastic is something which affects us all. From bags and containers washed up on beaches to the plastic filled garbage gyres that circulate within the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans, human activity is polluting the oceans with plastic and waste. The United Nations believe that as many as 51 trillion particles of microplastic are in the oceans, which is a huge environmental problem.

Everyone will have seen images of dolphins, turtles or birds either eating or being trapped by plastic waste. However, recently Dr Richard Kirby – a friend of Pixalytics – was able to film plastic microfibre being eaten by plankton. As plankton are, in turn, eaten by many marine creatures, this is one example of how waste plastic is entering the food chain. The video can seen here on a BBC report.

Dr Kirby also runs the Secchi Disk project which is a citizen science project to study phytoplankton across the globe and receives data from every ocean.

Get Involved With World Oceans Day

The world oceans are critical to the health of the planet and us! They help regulate climate, generate most of the oxygen we breathe and provide a variety of food and sources of medicines. So everyone should want to help protect and conserve these natural environments. They are a number of ways you can get involved:

  • Participate: There are events planned all across the world. You can have a look here and see if any are close to you.
  • Look: The Ocean Project website has a fantastic set of resources available.
  • Think: Can you reduce your use, or reliance on plastic?
  • Promote: Talk about World Oceans Day, Oceans and their importance.

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