Blue Phase at Wavelength 2018

Blue John Cavern

Last week I attended the 2018 Wavelength Conference in Sheffield. This is an annual gathering for the Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry Society (RSPSoc) and is geared towards PhD students and early career scientists. The conference aim is to provide a welcoming and constructive atmosphere to present research and progress towards PhD’s, coupled with a vibrant social programme.

This was my first experience of a remote sensing conference and the cosy nature of the common room where it was held alongside the lack of pressure of a larger event lent itself well to its ambition.

The topics covered by the research varied greatly, each with a focus on how to apply remote sensing and photogrammetry techniques in novel ways to better understand the world around us. These ranged from tracking whales to monitoring rice fields and developing systems to track small scale landslides.

One key technology which was popular among the presentations was the application of machine learning, the training of an artificial intelligence (AI) to classify images for a variety of purposes. Given it is something I’m becoming involved in at Pixalytics, every mention of AI attracted my attention. One presentation which stuck out for me was its application to track the effects of crude oil pollution in the Niger delta region. Harnessing remote sensing data and utilising the power of machine learning to sift through hundreds or even thousands of images, classify details and pick out objects of interest to monitor environmental damage is a novel approach. It provides a direct link from the science to a serious real-world issue. Whilst a localised case, the techniques demonstrated have the potential to better inform our responses to these issues which in turn will help people being affected by these disasters.

This application of science combined with the potential to one day help people resonated with me greatly. It reminded me of the work I am currently doing on the Drought and Flood Mitigation Service project which will aid the lives of Ugandan farmers.

Two keynotes were delivered during the conference, one by Dr. Alistair Graham, from Geoger Ltd, and one from the Chairman of RSPSoc Dr. Richard Armitage. Dr. Graham’s keynote was fascinating as he delivered his experiences working in a multitude of different environments from corporate to SME’s in industry to post doc positions in academia. He explained the nuances of working in each area and the possible paths for career progression open to PhD students and other early career scientists. I fall into the latter category, but the perspective he provided convinced me to keep my options open for the future. At a time when industry and academia is changing rapidly anything could happen.

Dr. Armitage’s keynote was on responsive remote sensing and his talk focused on how to use the right remote sensing data at the right time and for the right area. For the problems we come across, identifying the correct approach to take with remote sensing data is crucial.

For example, two important factors to consider for any problem are spatial resolution and data type. Some features require 5m to be visible, whereas for others the 30m resolution can show what is required. Further to consider is what type of data is best suited for the problem, optical data has its advantages but infra-red can reveal insights that optical data cannot. Having come across these points before the keynote, it served as a good reinforcement on the topic.

Blue John in the rock.

The highlight of the conference for me was the tour around Blue John cavern. Tucked away in the Peak District, surrounded by stunning views of the hills, the cavern is home to the famous Blue John stone. The tour guide was a miner who had worked in the cavern for 15 years and his knowledge on the tour was remarkable, making every stop ever more interesting.

Whilst a lot of walking and climbing was done, the colourful Blue John that spotted the walls of the cavern, together with the extremely high ceilings carved out by long gone rivers made for amazing views. If you don’t mind cramped spaces and traversing up and down a large mine, then Blue John cavern is a fantastic place to go!

For my first conference experience Wavelength 2018 was a fantastic introduction. The welcoming atmosphere, getting to see the diverse nature of remote sensing and photogrammetry research going on right now and the insightful keynotes will stick with me for a long time. I highly recommend any early career scientist or PhD student to attend the next incarnation of this conference.

Chris Doyle
Junior Software Developer
Pixalytics Ltd

2 thoughts on “Blue Phase at Wavelength 2018

  1. A well written article; your passion for the field you work in shines through.
    Well done for seizing the opportunity to attend the conference.

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