Inspiring the Next Generation of EO Scientists

Artist's rendition of a satellite - 3dsculptor/123RF Stock Photo

Artist’s rendition of a satellite – 3dsculptor/123RF Stock Photo

Last week, whilst Europe’s Earth Observation (EO) community was focussed on the successful launch of Sentinel-5P, over in America Tuesday 10th October was Earth Observation Day!

This annual event is co-ordinated by AmericaView, a non-profit organisation, whose aim to advance the widespread use of remote sensing data and technology through education and outreach, workforce development, applied research, and technology transfer to the public and private sectors.

Earth Observation Day is a Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) event celebrating the Landsat mission and its forty-five year archive of imagery. Using satellite imagery provides valuable experience for children in maths and sciences, together with introducing subjects such as land cover, food production, hydrology, habitats, local climate and spatial thinking. The AmericaView website contains a wealth of EO materials available for teachers to use, from fun puzzles and games through to a variety of remote sensing tutorials. Even more impressive is that the event links schools to local scientists in remote sensing and geospatial technologies. These scientists provide support to teachers including giving talks, helping design lessons or being available to answer student’s questions.

This is a fantastic event by AmericaView, supporting by wonderful resources and remote sensing specialists. We first wrote about this three years ago, and thought the UK would benefit from something similar. We still do. The UK Space Agency recently had an opportunity for organisations interested in providing education and outreach activities to support EO, satellite launch programme or the James Webb Space Telescope. It will be interesting to see what the successful candidates come up with.

At Pixalytics we’re passionate about educating and inspiring the next generation of EO scientists. For example, we regularly support the Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry Society’s Wavelength conference for students and early career scientists; and sponsored the Best Early-Career Researcher prize at this year’s GISRUK Conference. We’re also involved with two exciting events at Plymouth’s Marine Biological Association, a Young Marine Biologists (YMB) Summit for 12-18 year olds at the end of this month and their 2018 Postgraduate conference.

Why is this important?
The space industry, and the EO sector, is continuing to grow. According to Euroconsult’s ‘Satellites to Be Built & Launched by 2026’ – I know this is another of the expensive reports we highlighted recently – there will be around 3,000 satellites with a mass above 50 kg launched in the next decade – of which around half are anticipated as being used for EO or communication purposes. This almost doubles the number of satellites launched in the last ten years and doesn’t include the increasing number of nano and cubesats going up.

Alongside the number of satellites, technological developments mean that the amount of EO data available is increasing almost exponentially. For example, earlier this month World View successfully completed multi-day flight of its Stratolliteâ„¢ service, which uses high-altitude balloons coupled with the ability to steer within stratospheric winds. They can carry a variety of sensors, a mega-pixel camera was on the recent flight, offering an alternative vehicle for collecting EO data.

Therefore, we need a future EO workforce who are excited, and inspired, by the possibilities and who will take this data and do fantastic things with it.

To find that workforce we need to shout about our exciting industry and make sure everyone knows about the career opportunities available.

Beware of the Bluetooth Gnomes and Other Stories from GISRUK 2017

Gorton Monastry, GISRUK 2017

The 2017 GIS Research UK (GISRUK) Conference took place last week in Manchester, and Pixalytics sponsored the Best Early-Career Researcher Prize.

I was looking forward to the event, but I nearly didn’t get there! I was planning to catch the train up from London on Wednesday. However, the trackside fire at Euston station put paid to that, as my train was cancelled. Instead I was at the station bright and early on Thursday morning.

The first presentation I saw was the inspiring keynote by Professor Andrew Hudson-Smith. He talked about ‘getting work out there and used’ and using the Internet of Things to create a ‘census of now’ i.e., rather than having census data a number of years out-of-date, collect it all of the time. Personally, I also enjoyed hearing about his Bluetooth gnomes in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, which talk to you about cyber security. A visit to his gnomes is definitely on my list for the next spare weekend in London!

I spent the rest of the afternoon in the Infrastructure stream of presentations where there were talks on spatially modelling the impact of hazards (such as flooding) on the National Grid network, human exposure to hydrocarbon pollution in Nigeria, deciding where to site, and what type of, renewable energy and investigating taxi journeys.

In the evening, the conference dinner was at ‘The Monastery’, also known as Gorton Monastery. Despite the name, it was actually a friary built by the Franciscan monks who travelled to Manchester in 1861 to serve the local Catholic community. It was one of the first churches to be completed by the Franciscans in England after the Reformation. It became derelict in the mid 1990’s and ended up on the World Monuments Fund Watch List of 100 Most Endangered Sites in the World. Since then it has been restored and is used as a spectacular community venue.

Friday started with the morning parallel sessions, and I picked ‘Visualisation’ followed by ‘Machine Learning’. Talks included ‘the Curse of Cartograms’ (and if you don’t know what these curses are, have a look here!), land-use mapping and tracking behaviour at music festivals using mobile phone generated data – which won the best spatial analysis paper. However, my favourite talk was given by Gary Priestnall on the projection augmented relief models, which use physical models of a location’s terrain that are then overlaid with imagery/videos shown using a projector. The effect was fantastic!

Our closing keynote, ‘The Great Age of Geography 2017’, was from Nick Crane, known to UK TV viewers as the ‘map man’. He reflected on the role of geographers throughout history and then into the future. He equated the breakthrough in printing, from wood blocks to copper plates that could be engraved in more detail and updated, to today’s transition from analogue to digital.

The conference finished with the awards. I was delighted to present Alyson Lloyd and James Cheshire with the Best Early-Career Researcher Prize for their presentation on ‘Challenges of Big Data for Social Science: Addressing Uncertainty in Loyalty Card Data’. Unfortunately, as it was on Wednesday afternoon, it wasn’t one I’d seen personally. However, I’ve downloaded the conference paper, available from here, and I’m look forward to reading it.

It was an excellent conference, and I was really enjoyed my time in Manchester. Looking forward to GISRUK 2018!