Have you read the top Pixalytics blogs of 2017?

World Cloud showing top 100 words from Pixalytics 2017 blogs

In our final blog of the year, we’re looking back at our most popular posts of the last twelve months. Have you read them all?

Of the top ten most read blogs, nine were actually written in previous years. These were:

You’ll notice that this list is dominated by our annual reviews of the number of satellites, and Earth observation satellites, orbiting the Earth. It often surprises us to see where these blogs are quoted and we’ve been included in articles on websites for Time Magazine, Fortune Magazine and the New Statesman to name a few!

So despite only being published in November this year coming in as the fourth most popular blog of the year was, unsurprisingly:

For posts published in 2017, the other nine most popular were:

2017 has been a really successful one for our website. The number of the views for the year is up by 75%, whilst the number of unique visitors has increased by 92%!

Whilst hard work, we do enjoy writing our weekly blog – although staring at a blank screen on a Wednesday morning without any idea of what we’ll publish a few hours later can be daunting!

We’re always delighted at meetings and conferences when people come up and say they read the blog. It’s nice to know that we’re read both within our community, as well as making a small contribution to informing and educating people outside the industry.

Thanks for reading this year, and we hope we can catch your eye again next year.

We’d like to wish everyone a Happy New Year, and a very successful 2018!

Merry Christmas!

UK at night. November 2017 monthly composite from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite,(Day/Night Band). Image and Data processing courtesy of Earth Observation Group, NOAA/NCEI.

MERRY CHRISTMAS

AND BEST WISHES FOR 2018 

from everyone at Pixalytics

UKSEDS National Student Space Conference 2017

The 2017 UKSEDS National Student Space Conference took place last weekend at the University of Exeter and I was delighted to be asked to give a presentation.

UKSEDS, the acronym of the ‘UK Students for the Exploration and Development of Space’, is a charity dedicated to running events for space students and graduates. It is the UK branch of global community who have the aim of promoting space, space exploration and research.

The National Student Space Conference is in its 29th year, and 2017 was the first time I’d attended. I began the Saturday morning with a panel discussion on Exploration versus Exploitation with Dr David Parker from the European Space Agency, Cathrine Armour who leads the South West Centre of Excellence in Satellite Applications and Andy Bacon from Thales Alenia Space UK.

One of the key points raised in the panel surrounded the topic’s title, and that it wasn’t a contest between exploration and exploitation, but rather that exploration is generally followed up with exploitation e.g. even in the 19th and 20th century explorations were politically motivated. However exploration is risky, and so it may be difficult to produce favourable outcomes that can be exploited.

Traditionally, commercial organisations were risk averse and therefore exploration has often been supported by public bodies. The exploitation came later from commercial organisations, but there’s now an increased appetite for risk through venture and crowd funding with space being a particular focus.

We also have hindsight of how we’ve altered planet Earth, and so need to apply this to space where we’ve completed our first survey of the solar system. Exploitation may not be far away as there are companies already aiming to mine asteroids, for example. So alongside investing in science and technology, we also need to invest in the governance to ensure that any future exploitation is undertaken responsibly.

Closer to Earth, it can be considered that we’ve not yet fully exploiting the potential of orbiting satellites. For example, we could use them for generating solar energy as a twenty four hour resource. So whilst exploration does tend to proceed exploitation, in fact it is probably more accurate to say we loop between the two with each providing feedback into the other.

My presentation session was between the coffee break and lunch. I was last up and followed Cathrine Armour, Matt Cosby from Goonhilly Earth Station Ltd and Dr Lucy Berthoud from the University of Bristol & Thales Alenia Space UK. My presentation was on “Innovations in Earth observation” and can be found here.

I particularly enjoyed Lucy’s talk where she posed the question – Is there life on Mars? She also had a crowd pleasing set of practical experiments involving dry ice and a rock from a local beach, which was a bit daunting to follow! Whilst Lucy concluded that Mars has the elements needed for life to exist in terms of nutrients, an energy source and liquid water, any life would likely to be microscopic.

However, there are large costs associated with us visiting Mars to confirm this. Ignoring the obvious cost of the flight, the decontamination aspect is huge. As mission planners have to avoid both forward and backward contamination, i.e., us contaminating Mars and the material brought back contaminating the Earth. This brings us back around to the morning panel and why exploration always tends to come first, supported by national or international bodies.

Overall, I had a great time at the Conference and would wholly recommend any students who have interest in space join UKSEDS. Membership is free and it can give you access to great events, opportunities and contacts. You can join here!