Five Learning Points For Developing An Earth Observation Product Portal

Landsat mosaic image of the Isle of Wight. Data courtesy of NASA.

This week we’re gently unveiling our Pixalytics Portal at the DATA.SPACE 2018 Conference taking place in Glasgow.

We’ve not attended DATA.SPACE before, but great feedback from some of the last years attendees convinced us to come. It’s an international conference focusing on the commercial opportunities available through the exploitation of space-enabled data and so it seemed the perfect place to demonstrate our new development.

Regular readers will know we’ve had the product portal idea for a little while, but it often went to the back of the work queue when compared to existing work, bid preparation and our other developments. Hence, six months ago we pinpointed the DATA.SPACE as our unveiling event!

On the 1st and 2nd February at Technology & Innovation Centre in Glasgow we have a stand where we’re inviting everyone to come up and have a look at the portal and give us feedback on the idea, principles and the look and feel of the portal.

We’re demonstrating five products, and we’re looking to expand this, these are:

  • Landscape Maps of the UK
  • Water Extent Mapping
  • Flood Water Mapping
  • Coastal Airborne Lidar Survey Planning Datasets
  • Open Ocean Water Quality Parameters

We’re not just attending, we’re exhibiting and Sam’s presenting!! So we’re going to have the full triumvirate conference experience. Sam is presenting in the first day’s second session titled ‘Looking at our Earth’ which starts at 11.10am. Her presentation is called ‘Growing Earth Observation By Being More Friendly.’

Developing this portal to its current state has been a really interesting journey. When we began we didn’t know why some of the larger companies haven’t cracked this already! Six months later and we’ve started to understand the challenges!

We thought it might be helpful to reveal are five top learning points for any other SME’s in our industry considering developing a portal. They are:

  1. Challenging the Digital e-commerce Process: Standard digital e-commerce systems allow customers to purchase a product and then download it immediately. The need to have an additional step of a few minutes, or even hours, to undertake data processing complicates things. It means that simple off-the-shelf plug-ins won’t work.
  2. Don’t Go for Perfection: Building a perfect portal will take time. We’ve adopted the approach of Eric Ries, author of The Startup Way, who advocates building a system for ten purchases. We’re perhaps a bit beyond that, but certainly we know that this will only be the first iteration of our portal.
  3. Linking The Moving Parts: Our portal has a web-front end, a cloud processing backend and the need to download requested data. We’ve tried to limit the amount of data and processing needed, but we can’t eliminate it entirely. This means there are a lot of moving parts to get right, and a lot of error capturing to be done!
  4. Legal & Tax issues: Sorting out the products is only one part of the process, don’t forget to do the legal and tax side as that has implications on your approach. We have learnt a lot about the specific requirements of digital services in e-commerce!
  5. Have a deadline: We chose to exhibit at DATA.SPACE to give us a deadline. We knew if we didn’t have a hard deadline we’d still be debating the products to include, and have developed none of them! The deadline has moved us really close to having a portal.

If you’re at DATA.SPACE this week, please come up and say hello. If you’ve got a few minutes to spare we’d love to get you feedback on our portal.

First Light Images

Mosaic image of The Netherlands created using three Sentinel-1 scans in March 2015.
Data Courtesy of Copernicus Sentinel data (2015)/ESA.

Two of the satellites launched on 12th January by the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) have released their first images. We wrote about the launch two weeks ago, and wanted to follow up on their initial outputs.

The first is the exciting ICEYE-X1, which is both the world’s first synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) microsatellite and Finland’s first commercial satellite. We currently use Sentinel-1 SAR imagery for some of Pixalytics flooding and water extent mapping products and so are really interested to see what this satellite produces.

One of the key advantages of radar satellites over optical ones is that they can capture images both during day and night, and are not hampered by the presence of clouds.  However, using a different part of the electromagnetic spectrum to optical satellites means that although it is black and white image it’s sometimes easier to distinguish objects within it.

Zoomed in portion of Netherlands mosaic image created using three Sentinel-1 scans in March 2015.
Data Courtesy of Copernicus Sentinel data (2015)/ESA.

For example, the image to the left is a zoomed in portion of Sentinel-1 mosaic of the Netherlands acquired in March 2015 where you can clearly see couple of off-shore windfarms.

Sentinel-1 is a twin satellite constellation and uses a C-Band SAR on board two identical satellites. Over land it captures data in an Interferometric Wide swath mode, which means it takes three scans and then combines them into a single image. Each scan has a width of 250 km and a spatial resolution of 5 m x 20 m, with a six day repeat cycle for an area of land.

In comparison, ICEYE-X1 produced its first image with a spatial resolution of 10 m, and it’s hoped to reduce this down to 3 m. It issued its first image on Monday 15th January, three days after launch, showing part of Alaska, including the Noatak National Preserve, with a ground coverage of approximately 80 km by 40 km. The image can be seen here.

ICEYE-X1 weighs in at under a 100 kg, which is less than a twentieth of Sentinel-1 which weighed in at 2 300kg. This size reduction produces a high reduction in the cost too, with estimates suggesting it only cost ICEYE around a hundredth of the €270 million price of the second Sentinel-1 satellite.

By 2020 ICEYE is hoping to establish a global imaging constellation of six SAT microsatellites that will be able to acquire multiple images of the same location on Earth each day. After this, the company has ambitions of launching 18 SAR-enabled microsatellites to bring reliable high temporal-resolution images which would enable every point on the Earth to be captured eight times a day.

Cartosat-2F also sent its first image on the 15th January. The image, which can be found here, is of the city of Indore, in the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh. The Holkar Stadium is tagged in the centre, a venue which has previously hosted test Cricket. The satellite carries a high resolution multi-spectral imager with 1 m spatial resolution and a swath width of 10 km.

It is the seventh satellite in the Cartosat series which began in 2007, the others are:

  • Cartosat 2 launched on 10th January 2007
  • Cartosat 2A launched on 28th April 2008
  • Cartosat 2B launched on 12th July 2010
  • Cartosat 2C launched on 22nd June 2016
  • Cartosat 2D launched on 15th February 2017
  • Cartosat 2E launched on 23rd June 2017

These two satellites are just at the start of their journey, and it will be interesting to see what amazing images they capture in the future.

Big Data From Space

Last week I attended the 2017 Conference on Big Data from Space (BiDS’17) that was held in Toulouse, France. The conference was co-organised by the European Space Agency (ESA), the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission (EC), and the European Union Satellite Centre (SatCen). It aimed to bring together people from multiple disciplines to stimulate the exploitation Earth Observation (EO) data collected in space.

The event started on Tuesday morning with keynotes from the various co-organising space organisations. Personally, I found the talk by Andreas Veispak, from the European Commission’s (EC) DG GROW department which is responsible for EU policy on the internal market, industry, entrepreneurship and SMEs, particularly interesting. Andreas has a key involvement in the Copernicus and Galileo programmes and described the Copernicus missions as the first building block for creating an ecosystem, which has positioned Europe as a global EO power through its “full, free and open” data policy.

The current Sentinel satellite missions will provide data continuity until at least 2035 with huge amounts of data generated, e.g., when all the Sentinel satellite missions are operational over 10 petabytes of data per year will be produced. Sentinel data has already been a huge success with current users exceeding what was expected by a factor of 10 or 20 and every product has been downloaded at least 10 times. Now, the key challenge is to support these users by providing useful information alongside the data.

The ESA presentation by Nicolaus Hanowski continued the user focus by highlighting that there are currently over 100 000 registered Copernicus data hub users. Nicolaus went on to describe that within ESA success is now being measured by use of the data for societal needs, e.g., the sustainable development goals, rather than just the production of scientific data. Therefore, one of the current aims is reduce the need for downloading by having a mutualised underpinning structure, i.e. the Copernicus Data and Information Access Services (DIAS) that will become operational in the second quarter of 2018, which will allow users to run their computer code on the data without the need for downloading. The hope is that this will allow users to focus on what they can do with the data, rather than worrying around storing it!

Charles Macmillan from JRC described their EO Data and Processing Platform (JEODPP) which is a front end based around the Jupyter Notebook that allows users to ask questions using visualisations and narrative text, instead of just though direct programming. He also noted that increasingly the data needed for policy and decision making is held by private organisations rather than government bodies.

The Tuesday afternoon was busy as I chaired the session on Information Generation at Scale. We had around 100 people who heard some great talks on varied subjects such as mass processing of Sentinel & Landsat data for mapping human settlements, 35 years of AVHRR data and large scale flood frequency maps using SAR data.

‘Application Of Earth Observation To A Ugandan Drought And Flood Mitigation Service’ poster

I presented a poster at the Wednesday evening session, titled “Application Of Earth Observation To A Ugandan Drought And Flood Mitigation Service”. We’re part of a consortium working on this project which is funded via the UK Space Agency’s International Partnership Programme. It’s focus is on providing underpinning infrastructure for the Ugandan government so that end users, such as farmers, can benefit from more timely and accurate information – delivered through a combination of EO, modelling and ground-based measurements.

It was interesting to hear Grega Milcinski from Sinergise discuss a similar approach to users from the lessons they learnt from building the Sentinel Hub. They separated the needs of science, business and end users. They’ve chosen not to target end users due to the challenges surrounding the localisation and customisation requirements of developing apps for end users around the world. Instead they’ve focussed on meeting the processing needs of scientific and business users to give them a solid foundation upon which they can then build end user applications. It was quite thought provoking to hear this, as we’re hoping to move towards targeting these end users in the near future!

There were some key technology themes that came of the presentations at the conference:

  • Jupyter notebooks were popular for frontend visualisation and data analytics, so users just need to know some basic python to handle large and complex datasets.
  • Making use of cloud computing using tools such as Docker and Apache Spark for running multiple instances of code with integrated parallel processing.
  • Raw data and processing on the fly: for both large datasets within browsers and by having the metadata stored so you can quickly query before committing to processing.
  • Analysis ready data in data cubes, i.e. the data has been processed to a level where remote sensing expertise isn’t so critical.

It was a great thought provoking conference. If you’d like to get more detail on what was presented then a book of extended abstracts is available here. The next event is planned for 19-21 February 2019 in Munich, Germany and I’d highly recommend it!

5 Signs You Work In Earth Observation

Sentinel-2A image of UK south east coastline, acquired on 4th September 2017. Data courtesy of ESA/Copernicus.

Do you recognise yourself in any these five signs? if so, you’re definitely working in the Earth observation industry.

  1. You have a favourite satellite or instrument, or image search tool.
  2. When a satellite image appears on television, you tell everyone in the room which satellite/sensor it came from.
  3. You’ve got an irrational hatred for clouds (unless you’re working on clouds or using radar images).
  4. Anything space related happens and your family asks whether you’re involved with it, and thinks you know everyone who works at NASA or ESA.
  5. Your first reaction to seeing an interesting location isn’t that you should plan to go there. Instead, you wonder whether it would make a good satellite image.

We tick all of these signs at Pixalytics! Last week we suffered from number five when we saw a snippet from the season finale of the UK TV programme ‘Liar’. It wasn’t a programme we’d watched, but as we caught an atmospheric panning shot of the location, and only one thought when through our minds, ‘That would make a great satellite image!’

It was a stunning shot of a marshland with water interwoven between islands. Without knowing anything about the programme, we were expecting it to have been filmed in a far flung Nordic location. Following a bit of impromptu googling we were surprised to discover it was actually Tollesbury on the Essex coast in the UK. It also turns out that we were late to the party on the discovery of the programme and the location.

Sentinel-2A image of Mersea Island and surrounding area, acquired on 4th September 2017. Data courtesy of ESA/Copernicus.

The image on the right shows Mersea Island, which has brown saltmarshes above it within the adjacent inlets of the Blackwater Estuary. To the left of the island is the village of Tollesbury and the Tollesbury marina, which is located within the saltmarshes. This area is the largest of the saltmarshes of Essex, but only the fifth largest of the UK. They play a key role in flood protection and can reduce the height of damaging waves in storm surge conditions by 20%. However, they are disappearing due to sea erosion that’s caused a sixty percent reduction in the last 20 years.

The image itself is a zoomed in pseudo-true-colour composite at 10 m spatial resolution using data acquired by Sentinel-2A on the 4th September 2017 – a surprisingly cloud free day for the UK. The full Sentinel-2 image can be seen at the top of the blog.

As often happens when we look in detail at satellite images, something catches our eye. This time it was the three bluish looking strips just above Mersea island. These are the 82,944 solar panels which make up Langenhoe Solar Farm, and have the capacity to generate 21.15 MW of solar power.

So how many of you recognise our signs of working in Earth observation? Any you think we’ve missed? Get in touch, let us know!

Flip-Sides of Soil Moisture

Soil Moisture changes between 19th and 25th August around Houston, Texas due to rainfall from Hurricane Harvey. Courtesy of NASA Earth Observatory image by Joshua Stevens, using soil moisture data courtesy of JPL and the SMAP science team.

Soil moisture is an interesting measurement as it can be used to monitor two diametrically opposed conditions, namely floods and droughts. This was highlighted last week by maps produced from satellite data for the USA and Italy respectively. These caught our attention because soil moisture gets discussed on a daily basis in the office, due to its involvement in a project we’re working on in Uganda.

Soil moisture can have a variety of meanings depending on the context. For this blog we’re using soil moisture to describe the amount of water held in spaces between the soil in the top few centimetres of the ground. Data is collected by radar satellites which measure microwaves reflected or emitted by the Earth’s surface. The intensity of the signal depends on the amount of water in the soil, enabling a soil moisture content to be calculated.

You can’t have failed to notice the devastating floods that have occurred recently in South Asia – particularly India, Nepal and Bangladesh – and in the USA. The South Asia floods were caused by monsoon rains, whilst the floods in Texas emanated from Hurricane Harvey.

Soil moisture measurements can be used to show the change in soil saturation. NASA Earth Observatory produced the map at the top of the blogs shows the change in soil moisture between the 19th and 25th August around Houston, Texas. The data is based on measurements acquired by the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite, which uses a radiometer to measure soil moisture in the top 5 centimetres of the ground with a spatial resolution of around 9 km. On the map itself the size of each of the hexagons shows how much the level of soil moisture changed and the colour represents how saturated the soil is.

These readings have identified that soil moisture levels got as high as 60% in the immediate aftermath of the rainfall, partly due to the ferocity of the rain, which prevented the water from seeping down into the soil and so it instead remained at the surface.

Soil moisture in Italy during early August 2017. The data were compiled by ESA’s Soil Moisture CCI project. Data couresy of ESA. Copyright: C3S/ECMWF/TU Wien/VanderSat/EODC/AWST/Soil Moisture CCI

By contrast, Italy has been suffering a summer of drought and hot days. This year parts of the country have not seen rain for months and the temperature has regularly topped one hundred degrees Fahrenheit – Rome, which has seventy percent less rainfall than normal, is planning to reduce water pressure at night for conservation efforts.

This has obviously caused an impact on the ground, and again a soil moisture map has been produced which demonstrates this. This time the data was come from the ESA’s Soil Moisture Climate Change Initiative project using soil moisture data from a variety of satellite instruments. The dataset was developed by the Vienna University of Technology with the Dutch company VanderSat B.V.

The map shows the soil moisture levels in Italy from the early part of last month, with the more red the areas, the lower the soil moisture content.

Soil moisture is a fascinating measurement that can provide insights into ground conditions whether the rain is falling a little or a lot.

It plays an important role in the development of weather patterns and the production of precipitation, and is crucial to understanding both the water and carbon cycles that impact our weather and climate.

Pixalytics: Five Years & Thriving!

Background Image: Sutichak Yachaingham / 123 Stock Photo

The start of June marked the five-year anniversary of Pixalytics!

For a small start-up business, like ours, five years is an important milestone. Depending on which you report you believe only around 50%, or even 40%, of new small business survive their five years! So we should definitely celebrate the fact that we’re still here!

The last twelve months have been successful for us. Our key highlights have included:

  • Continuing to grow our income year-on-year
  • Expanded our team to five, soon to be six, employees – which is a 100% increase over the last year!
  • Moved to a new office on Plymouth Science Park
  • Part of a consortium developing a Drought and Flood Mitigation Service (DFMS) in Uganda.
  • Secured our first European Contract and so now we are exporters!

It has been a lot of hard work, but we’re really pleased with what we’ve achieved.

In a similar blog last year, we wrote about our target of releasing an innovative series of automated Earth Observation products and services. You’ll have noticed that this is not listed in our highlights, as despite our efforts we’ve not managed to do this … yet.

We have made significant progress with our eStore. We have a number of products almost ready to go, the product interface has been developed and we’re currently developing the front end eCommerce website. We’re intending to go live with flooding, turbidity and ocean colour products. So watch this space, things will be happening later this year – we hope!

Launching the products is really the easy bit, the difficult part will be getting people to buy them and this a challenge which firms much larger than us are still to effectively solve. As a small business we tend to market through our website, social media and the odd exhibition. However, we’ll need to come up with some new cost-effective innovative ideas for our eStore if it is to be successful. We’re also participating in Europe wide projects established by EARSC and the Copernicus World Alliance looking at ways of developing the market and promoting Earth Observation products and services.

For the last couple of years we’ve quoted a phrase from ‘Worstward Ho’, a monologue by Samuel Beckett which is ‘Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better.’

This sums up our approach. We try things. If they don’t work out, we try something else. It’s worked okay so far.

Before we leave our five year celebration, we wanted to take the opportunity to thank all of the people who’ve helped us along our journey, including the readers of our blog.

Let’s hope we’re still here in another five years!

UK Space Conference Getting Ready For Take Off

Next week we’ll be in Manchester at the 2017 UK Space Conference.

The UK Space Conference is held every two years, and attracted over 1,000 delegates and over 100 exhibitors when held in Liverpool in 2015. It is a key event that brings together the UK Space Community and this year is taking place over three days, 30th May to the 1st June.

We are exhibiting on stand C7, near the centre of the hall, where you’ll be able to come and talk to us about our products and services including:

  • Atmospheric correction
  • Consultancy services
  • Education & training
  • Flood mapping
  • Ocean colour
  • Spatial analyses & data management
  • Terrestrial vegetation
  • Turbidity mapping

We’re also delighted to announce that our Flood Mapping work is one of the products highlighted in the Innovation Zone, which is sponsored by Innovate UK. It is a low cost floodwater mapping product based on Sentinel-1 radar data, which provides easy to understand flood information and maps through an online portal without the need for specialist knowledge. We have partnered with Harris Geospatial Solutions to provide a fully automated solution.

We’ll also have copies of our book for sale, ‘Practical Handbook of Remote Sensing’. This takes complete novices through the process of finding, downloading, processing, visualising and applying remote sensing satellite data using their own PC, open-source software and a standard internet connection.

The 2017 UK Space Conference itself begins on the Tuesday morning with ‘Space 101’, which is a series of workshops covering some of the key issues related to working in the space sector. The conference then kicks off at lunchtime on the Tuesday with an opening plenary on the latest developments in the UK space sector.

There is a networking event in the Exhibition Hall between 6pm and 9pm on Tuesday evening, and we’ll be on our stand all evening.

Wednesday is brimming over with workshops, presentations, plenary and poster sessions, culminating in the Gala Dinner and Sir Arthur Clarke Awards. Finally, Thursday has another busy day of workshops and plenary sessions, before the Conference closes in the afternoon.

We’re really excited about being in Manchester next week, and looking forward to meeting old and new friends.

We hope that any of you who at the Conference will come up and say hello! We’d love to meet you!

Supporting Uganda’s Farmers

Map of Uganda showing vegetation productivity. Underlying data is the MODIS 2014 NPP Product, MOD17 – Zhoa et al. (2005).

Uganda is a landlocked country of just over 240,000 square kilometres. Agriculture is a key element of the country’s economy and was responsible for 23% of gross domestic product in 2011 and almost half the country’s exports the following year. According to the Food & Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations, 80% of the population relies on farming for its livelihood.

It has an equatorial climate, with regional variations, although recent recurrent dry spells have impacted on crop and livestock productivity. Pixalytics is delighted to be part of a consortium led by the RHEA Group, working with the Ugandan Ministry of Water and Environment and local NGOs to develop a Drought and Flood Mitigation Service (DFMS) to give practical information to help local communities respond to the effects of climate change.

Using computer models populated with satellite, meteorological, water resources and ground based data an innovative Environment Early Warning Platform will be developed to provide Ugandan farmers, via local NGO organisations, with forecasts throughout the growing seasons to enable them to take actions to maximise their crop yield.

Pixalytics, along with fellow consortium member, Environment Systems, are responsible for the Earth Observation data in the project. We’ll be looking at variety of optical and radar data to provide information about flood and drought conditions alongside crops and their growing conditions.

The project should benefit local communities by:

  • Improving the ability to forecast and mitigate droughts and floods on a local actionable scale.
  • Allowing NGOs to target resources saving time, money and lives.
  • Allowing farmers to improve their lives and better protect their livestock and crops.

Alongside ourselves, and RHEA Group, our consortium includes Environment Systems, Databasix, AA International, AgriTechTalk International, HR Wallingford, UK Met Office, Mercy Corps, and Oxford Policy Management. We will also work with international partners, including the Uganda Government Ministries, Kakira Sugar Company, and the NGO Green Dreams/iCOW. The first of a number of visits to Uganda took place last week, where we had the opportunity to make lots of local contacts and meet some of those whom we hope to benefit from this work.

This work is part of the UK Space Agency’s International Partnership Programme and ours is one of 21 projects chosen to provide solutions to local issues in counties across Africa, Asia, Central and South America.

This is a really exciting project to be involved with, and we’re looking forward to providing useful information to local farmers to allow them to take real and meaningful action to enhance the productivity, and protection, of their livestock and crops.

UK Government View On ESA and Space Industry

Artist's rendition of a satellite - paulfleet/123RF Stock Photo

Artist’s rendition of a satellite – paulfleet/123RF Stock Photo

This week we got a glimpse of the UK Government’s view on the space industry, with the publication of Satellites and Space: Government Response to the House of Commons Science & Technology Committee’s Third Report of Session 2016/17. The original report was published in June and contained a series of recommendations, to which the Government responded.

The timing is interesting for two reasons:

  • Firstly, it comes just before the European Space Agency (ESA) Ministerial Council taking place on Thursday and Friday this week in Lucerne. We highlighted the importance of this meeting in a recent blog.
  • Secondly, it has taken the Government five months to respond, something the Committee themselves were disappointed with.

The Government’s response has a number of insights into the future for the UK space industry. The full report can be seen here, but we wanted to pick out three things that caught our eye:

For us, and the ESA Ministerial, the most interesting comment was that the Government reaffirmed that the UK will remain a member of ESA after Brexit. It also noted that “The UK’s investment in the European Space Agency is an important part of our overall investment in space, from which we obtain excellent value.” Whilst the level of financial commitment to ESA won’t become clear until the Ministerial, the mood music seems positive.

Earth Observation
The role of the Space for Smarter Government Programme (SSGP) was highlighted, particularly in relation to helping the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs use satellite data more. As part of SSGP we ran a successful Flood Mapping project during 2015/16. SSGP is running again this year, but given the importance placed on the programme on embedding space activities within Government it was disappointing not to see a further commitment beyond March 2017.

A business plan for a Government Earth Observation Service is currently being written, which is aimed at increasing the uptake of EO data within Government. We’ve not seen too much about this service yet, and will be very interested in the business plan.

Responding a question on harnessing the public interest in Tim Peake’s time in space, it was nice to see the work of the EO Detective highlighted. This is a fantastic project that raises awareness of the space industry in schools, and uses space/satellite imagery to help children explore topics such as climate change.

Small Satellites
“The Government intends to establish the UK as the European hub for low cost launch of small satellites.” It’s an interesting ambition; although it’s not completely clear what they mean by the term small satellites. As we described last week definitions are important.

On top of the three points above there were some words on funding for space related research; however these amounted to no more than an acknowledgement that various Government bodies will work together. There was also reference to the development of a new Space Growth Strategy, something we’ll talk more about in two weeks.

The Government’s response to this report was an interesting read, and whilst there are still a lot of unanswered questions it does hint at cautious optimism that they will support the space industry.

We were all on tenterhooks this week waiting the big announcements from the ESA Ministerial, and here are some of the headline outcomes:

  • Overall, ESA’s 22 member states plus Slovenia and Canada allocated €10.3 billion for space activities and programmes over the next five years. This includes an EO programme valued at €1.37 bn up until 2025.

Within this overall envelope, the UK has allocated €1.4 bn funding over five years, which equates to 13.5% of total. This includes:

  • €670.5 m for satellite technology including telecommunications, navigation and EO.
  • €376.4 m for science and space research
  • €82,4 m for the ExoMars programme.
  • €71 m for the International Space Station Programme
  • €22 m for innovate space weather missions

Our eye was, of course, drawn to the investment in EO and there is a little more detail, with the €670.5 m is:€60 m for the development of the commercial use of space data €228.8 m for environmental science applications and climate services through ESA’s EO programme, including:

  • Incubed – a new programme to help industry develop the Earth observation satellite technology for commercial markets
  • the Biomass mission to measure the carbon stored in the world’s forests
  • the Aeolus mission, measuring wind speed in three dimensions from space

Finally, it is worth noting Katherine Courtney, Chief Executive of the UK Space Agency, who commented, “This significant investment shows how the UK continues to build on the capability of the UK space sector and demonstrates our continuing strong commitment to our membership in the European Space Agency.”

Ten Top Tips Learnt Working for a Small Remote Sensing Company

Artist's rendition of a satellite - mechanik/123RF Stock Photo

Artist’s rendition of a satellite – mechanik/123RF Stock Photo

I am approaching the end of my year at Pixalytics, and this blog is summary of what I’ve learnt from working for a small commercial remote sensing company.

The work itself has been a real blessing for me. Remote sensing product development was just the role I had been looking for, so I took it on with relish. During the year I have spent time researching, and supporting the product development of, flood mapping using SAR imagery, vegetation time series and light pollution.

I’ve learnt a huge amount over the past twelve months, and here are my top ten tips on researching & developing remote sensing products:

  1. Keep in mind who your stakeholders are and exactly what they require.
  2. Ensure your ground site is really covered by the satellite image, as coverage tends to be diagonal rather than straightforward latitude and longitude square and can miss a site altogether.
  3. Practise program version control at all times!
  4. Check the images you are using are the best ones for your requirements, i.e., not 16 day composites when daily images are more suitable and available; stopping you wasting a day downloading the wrong images!
  5. Write down problem solving routines, so next time you can do it for yourself!
  6. It’s always important to run pilots and streamline programming. This will save time and effort, and help verify that your end product is statistically robust.
  7. Write down what you find and keep good records of your algorithms and programming, so that you don’t duplicate work.
  8. Write technical notes on your work, so that programs can be easily shared, reviewed and run by others.
  9. Allow sufficient time before deadlines for reviewing and reworking.
  10. Make notes on the data you are using as you go along, including source, dates, locations and any company/organisation credits needed.

These are all lessons I’ll be taking with me when I leave, whether in commerce or academia.

It’s also been an insight into how a business is run, via these activities and hearing (one side!) of Sam’s teleconferences. Plus I’ve been involved in valuable encounters with the Environment Agency on products and have attended conferences, and given a presentation at one, on behalf of Pixalytics.

Plymouth has also been fun to explore. I’ve enjoyed visiting the various arts venues all over the city together with the galleries and museums, festivals and excellent cuisine.

Many thanks to Sam and Andy at Pixalytics for giving me this opportunity. I’m sad to leave and have enjoyed my time here.

Blog written by Dr Louisa Reynolds.